What Are Some Religiosity And Spirituality Views Towards Disability? (Correct answer)

How do spiritual and religious dimensions relate to disability?

  • Understanding which spiritual and religious dimensions are disproportionately more likely to exist among a given population with a particular disability helps practitioners provide more effective services to members of that group. Disability is an issue of prominent concern to social workers and other helping professionals.

Contents

How does religion view disability?

Some priests and scholars took the view that disability was a punishment from God for committing sins, as is often described in the Bible. Others believed that those with disabilities were more pious than non-disabled people.

What is religiosity and spirituality?

Religion and spirituality are related but distinct, as held by previous research where spirituality relates to interconnectedness with a transcendent being (spiritual perceptions) [29] and religiosity is the interpersonal and institutional engagement with a formal religious group, doctrines and traditions (frequency of

How can you help spiritually a person with disability?

9 Ways to Provide Spiritual Care to Your Patients & Their

  1. Take Your Cues from the Patient.
  2. Demonstrate a Christ-like Attitude.
  3. Support Patients Within Their Own Faith Tradition.
  4. Share an Encouraging Thought or Word.
  5. Join a Team that Supports Spiritual Care.

What does it mean to be spiritually disabled?

Heads of state in many countries seem to have developed severe Spiritual Disability – these are despots who live lavish, extravagant lifestyles, while their subjects live in deplorable poverty deprived of basic human necessities and basic human dignity.

What are the causes of disability?

Injuries due to road traffic accidents, occupational injury, violence, conflicts, falls and landmines have long been recognized as contributors to disability. Mental health problems– mental health retardation and mental illness are the causes of mental disability.

Is disability a curse?

Disability, be it physical or mental, has been largely misunderstood by many. While some fail to understand the condition, others might be insensitive to it.

What are the examples of spirituality?

Spirituality is the state of having a connection to God or the spirit world. An example of spirituality is praying every day.

What are three types of spiritual practices?

What are three types of spiritual practices? Reflection, relationships, and faith rituals.

What are the spiritual support?

What is Spiritual Support? Spiritual support is typically the work of hospital chaplains, who work with local religious and spiritual leaders to help provide spiritual support for patients near the end of their lives. The goal is to help the person feel peace and comfort.

Why are spiritual needs important?

Every human being needs spiritual resources to help heal the painful wounds of grief, guilt, resentment, unforgiveness, self-rejection, and shame. We also need spiritual resources to deepen our experiences of trust, self-esteem, hope, joy and love of life.

What are the spiritual needs of a patient?

Spiritual needs are those needs whose satisfaction causes the person’s spiritual growth and make the person a social, hopeful individual who always thanks God. They include the need for communication with others, communication with God, and being hopeful.

What is physical disability?

A physical disability is a physical condition that affects a person’s mobility, physical capacity, stamina, or dexterity. This can include brain or spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, respiratory disorders, epilepsy, hearing and visual impairments and more.

Disability and religion – Wikipedia

Those who study the confluence of disability and religion are interested in how handicapped individuals are treated within religious communities, the religious texts of those faiths, or the general contribution from religious discourse on issues pertaining to disability. Some studies on the link between religion and disability are controversial, with some positing the presence of ableism while others believe that religion is the primary means by which handicapped persons may be assisted by their loved ones and communities.

The mentally disabled, as well as children who die before reaching maturity due to both lacking an understanding of their actions, are frequently exempt from judgment in the afterlife in religions that hold to an eschatological belief in divine judgment.

According to certain faiths, the difference between disabled persons and the able-bodied allows the able-bodied to reflect, and God may then measure the degree of appreciation demonstrated by each individual for their health.

Buddhism

According to the author of the book, The Words of my Perfect TeacherbyPatrul Rinpoche, the presence of a handicap that prevents a person from comprehending the notion ofdharma would hinder a person from being able to practice Buddhism.

Contemporary Buddhism

The majority of Buddhists believe that badkarma (which results from morally reprehensible conduct) is the root cause of infirmity. Buddhists also think that demonstrating compassion to others who are less fortunate than themselves (known as songsarn), especially those who are crippled, would aid in the development of their own good karma, which they believe will help them achieve enlightenment. People with disabilities who live in largely Buddhist communities face a number of challenges as a result of this.

Putting a strong focus on compassion has been associated with a reluctance to promote independence and social involvement in individuals with impairments.

According to the World Bank, while this act of generosity may be commendable, it does not advance the cause of equality for persons with disabilities.

Christianity

According to the majority of Buddhists, disability is caused by badkarma (which develops from immoral conduct). Buddhists also think that expressing compassion to others who are less fortunate than themselves (known as songsarn), especially those who are crippled, can aid in the development of their own good karma, which they believe will help them achieve greater success in life. People with disabilities who live in largely Buddhist communities face a number of challenges as a result of this development.

Putting a strong focus on compassion has been connected to a reluctance to promote independence and social involvement in individuals with impairments.

According to the World Bank, while this act of generosity may be commendable, it does not advance the cause of equality for individuals who are disabled in society.

The Bible

A physical impairment is shown as a penalty for sin in many passages of the Bible. In the New Testament, Jesus is frequently shown performing miraculous healings on people who are physically disabled, while others feel that Jesus was still referring to sin as the source of physical impairment. The Bible makes no mention of intellectual disability or intellectual impairment. When compared to Christ mending the man born blind (John 9:1-12), when Jesus rejected the belief that handicap was a penalty for sin, this perspective is refreshing.

“Neither this man nor his parents have sinned,” Jesus said, “but this has happened in order for the works of God to be manifested in him.”

Early Christianity

During the Middle Ages, there were two main ways to dealing with people who were disabled. Disabilities, according to certain priests and academics, were a punishment from God for crimes committed, as is frequently recounted in the Bible. Others claimed that persons with disabilities were more religious than people who were not impaired. As a further example, Martin Luther was of the opinion that disability was caused by sin, and it is documented that he advised the Prince of Dessau to kill a little child who had physical and mental problems.

Contemporary Christianity

In certain Christian denominations and in some communities where Christianity is the prevalent religion, disability is still associated with sin, despite the passage of time. Persons suffering from mental diseases and neurological abnormalities are often sent to prayer camps affiliated with Evangelical and Pentecostal churches in Ghana, where they are assisted in trying to overcome their condition. Because of the manner that persons in prayer camps are frequently handled, Human Rights Watch has criticised the practice of holding prayer camps.

Christians with impairments have often expressed a sense of unwelcomeness when attending church services.

Some Christians, on the other hand, believe that as a result of their religious beliefs, they have a responsibility to care for individuals who are disabled.

Hinduism

Despite the fact that Ashtavakra was born with eight physical defects, he was credited with writing the Hindu sacred scripture. It was Ashtavakra Gitaand who was considered a famous Vedic guru. In the story, he is said to have prevailed over the intellectuals at King Janaka’s court, who made fun of his physical handicaps. Surdas, a 16th-century Hindu poet and musician who is credited with composing more than 125,000 songs, is also recognized as a great religious figure in the same vein as the Buddha.

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The Bhagavad Gita emphasizes detachment from the world and the development of a perspective that sees pain and suffering as neither good nor bad.

Hindu teachings suggest that handicapped individuals who are despondent should approach life in a positive manner and with a positive attitude by adhering to the principles of Dharma.

Contemporary Hinduism

As with Buddhism, Hindus believe that negative karma is the source of handicap, but they do not think that this is enforced by an outside punishing power or by God. Additionally, philanthropic deeds, like as donating money to those in need, are seen as beneficial actions that will aid in the development of a person’s good karma for their subsequent lives. Despite the fact that disability is often regarded as a social embarrassment, with some families confining disabled family members to the home, Hinduism stipulates that it is theDharmicduty of all able-bodied individuals to care for those who are disabled and to extend charity to those who are disabled.

Islam

Disabilities are not considered to be the result of wrongdoing on the part of the impaired individual or their parents under Islamic law. Islam considers handicap to be a test posed by Allah himself. The Qur’an exhorts people to treat persons with intellectual impairments with kindness and to provide protection for those who are physically or mentally disabled. Muhammedis have demonstrated a willingness to treat crippled individuals with dignity.

Early Islam

A foundation known as Bayt al-malwas created during the early Islamic caliphate to offer money for persons in need, which included the handicapped, using funds provided by the zakat. According to Ibn Fahd’s book al-Nukat al-Zirâf, published in the 16th century, disability may be caused by disobeying prophets and can also be healed by prophets, despite the fact that the books were met with great opposition when they were published at the time.

Contemporary Islam

There is a high emphasis in Saudi Arabia on equality for children and people with special needs, which is rooted on Islam’s beliefs on physical and mental disabilities. As a result of the theory of dawarism, some Muslims families describe feelings of shame over having a crippled member and refuse to enable a disabled person to participate in important components of Islam, such as attending theMosque and fasting during Ramadan.

Judaism

In the Torah, Yahweh causes handicap as a punishment for sins committed against the people. God, on the other hand, tells Jews in Israel not to “insult the deaf, nor put a stumbling block in front of the blind,” among other things. In addition, Halakha believes that individuals should show compassion to those who are ill.

Contemporary Judaism

According to the results of a study of American Jews with disabilities, less than one in every five Jews said that Jewish organizations were performing “very well” or “very well” in integrating handicapped individuals into their communities. Jewish day schools are also exempt from the requirements of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Children with impairments are being integrated into mainstream schools in Israel, according to the findings of a research conducted among the Haredicommunity there.

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Further reading

  • Dunya A. A. Ahmed’s doctoral thesis, “Doctoral Theses: Gender, Disability, and Islam: Living with Visual Impairment in Bahrain,” was published in October 2008. DisabilitySociety, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 539–541. doi: 10.1080/09687590802328295.S2CID218524121 (09687590802328295). The whole text may be found at:

External links

The purpose of this paper is to provide the findings of a qualitative interpretative research that investigated how individuals with disabilities and their families utilize their spiritual beliefs to build meaning for disability and to adapt to the challenges of living with disability. The participants’ impressions of the evangelical Christian church’s effect on their spiritual experiences connected to disability lead to recommendations for the church to better include disabled people into its programs and services.

  • Background/rationale: The use of spiritual beliefs to construct meaning for and respond to life with handicap has received little attention in the literature, despite the fact that it is a well-established topic in the field of child development.
  • Design/methods: The author conducted in-depth interviews with 30 people, who were divided into two broad groups: 13 parents of children with mixed developmental difficulties and nine individuals who have physical disabilities.
  • A trial or hardship contributes to spiritual challenge, the breaking down of one’s own self-reliance, and the strengthening of one’s confidence in God, according to the research findings.
  • The spiritual beliefs of the participants helped to stabilize their lives by giving meaning to their impairment experiences, offering aid with coping, and providing other advantages.

Concluding remarks: Although the study design restricts the generalizability of the findings, there are implications for assisting professionals and religious leaders who provide comprehensive health and wellness services.

Similar articles

  • Scope and objectives:This article reflects on the findings of a qualitative interpretative research that looked into how persons with disabilities and their family members utilize their spiritual beliefs to make sense of disability and adapt to the challenges of living with disability. Considering the participants’ impressions of the evangelical Christian church’s effect on their spiritual experiences connected to disability, this study makes recommendations for the church to better integrate disabled people into local communities. A call for applications is being made for helpful professionals and religious leaders who are committed to providing comprehensive care. Background/rationale: The use of spiritual beliefs to build meaning for and respond to life with disability has received little attention in the literature, despite the fact that it is a well-established topic in the field of pediatric disability. We also know very little about how people who hold certain religious beliefs in common interpret their lived experiences with disabilities. Design/methods: Twenty-one people were interviewed by the author, with two primary groups represented: thirteen parents of children with mixed developmental difficulties and nine adults with physical disabilities. When the study began in 1998, the majority of the participants were white and resided in a south-western metropolis in the United States of America (USA). A trial or hardship contributes to spiritual challenge, the breaking down of one’s own self-reliance, and the strengthening of one’s confidence in God, according to the findings. Despite the hardships that many people with disabilities face, the participants decided to live with gratitude and joy. In addition to giving meaning for the participants’ experiences of impairment, spiritual beliefs also provided them with aid in managing their disabilities and other advantages. Participants’ proposals include enhanced aid by the church in fostering theological understanding of disability, and religious support based on an ongoing model of care, according to the survey participants. Concluding remarks: While the study design restricts the generalizability of the findings, there are implications for assisting professionals and religious leaders who provide comprehensive health-care services.

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  • 40(1):29-41. Published online January 14, 2014. Child Care Health Dev. 2014.PMID:23452318. doi: 10.1111/cch.12031. Epub 2013 Mar 3. Determining links between physical health and spiritual experience, religious practices, and congregational support in a diverse medical sample is available as a free PMC publication. Campbell JD, Yoon DP, Johnstone B.Campbell JD, Yoon DP, Johnstone B.Campbell JD, et al. The Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine and Health Care, March 2010, volume 49, number 1, pages 3-17. doi: 10.1007/s10943-008-9227-5. Epub 2008 Dec 9. 2010.PMID:20162451
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Facets of Faith: Spirituality, Religiosity, and Parents of Individuals With Intellectual Disability

Skip nav destinationArticle navigation Skip nav destination Article de recherche|1st December, 2019 Wheaton College’s Thomas L. Boehm and Vanderbilt University’s Erik W. Carter are among others who have contributed to this work. Other works by this author may be found at: Erik W. Carter’s website. Thomas L. Boehm of Wheaton College and Erik W. Carter of Vanderbilt University are the authors of this paper. Look for other works by this author on: Intellect Dev Disabilities(2019) 57 (6): 512–526 or on PubMed.

Abstract

Although spirituality occupies a prominent position in the current American landscape, little attention has been paid to the confluence of faith and disability and families. In this study, we looked at the spiritual and religious lives of 530 parents and caregivers who had family members with intellectual disabilities. Faith was clearly relevant for the majority of participants, which was evident in their congregational engagement, beliefs, practices, and level of faith strength, among other things.

The majority of participants were able to identify ways in which their spirituality and religious activity contributed to their overall well-being and happiness.

We discuss the ramifications of this for professionals who work with these families as well as congregations that welcome them.

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Disability and Religion: Studies and Overview

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Main Document

Many people have a misunderstanding about disability, whether it is physical or mental in nature. Disability occupies an uneasy position in religious texts and traditions, ranging from healing miracles that position the disabled body as a site for the manifestation of religious faith to sacred scriptures that treat disability as a form of deviance or as an expression of divine judgment, among other things. There are many who do not comprehend the situation, others who are oblivious to it, as well as those who feel that handicap is a curse, all of which are valid points of contention.

All of these factors can have a significant positive influence on mental health; for example, evidence shows that religion can lower rates of suicide, alcoholism, and drug use.

Families with impaired relatives in rural communities sometimes hold the mother responsible for the birth of a disabled child and employ harsh methods to ill-treat them.

Christianity

Christians frequently embrace the medical paradigm of impairment that is currently in vogue. This paradigm is based on what non-disabled individuals believe is the most beneficial for people with disabilities. Studies on the link between religion and disability, and in particular the history of Christianity, have revealed a wide range of views toward people with disabilities. During the Middle Ages, there were two main ways to dealing with people who had impairments. Disabilities, according to certain priests and academics, were a punishment from God for crimes committed, as is frequently recounted in the Bible.

  1. When it comes to disability studies, secular voices are frequently heard that believe that religious ideology has no place in the field of disability studies.
  2. (2) In the Christian Bible, disability is regarded as an illness that must be treated (The Interpreters Dictionary of the Bible: 1962; Encyclopedia Judaica: 1972).
  3. In antiquity, visual impairment was the most prevalent type of physical handicap to be encountered.
  4. As a curse and as a result of disbelief and ignorance, it is seen as such (Jewish Encyclopedia, 1920; The Talmud of Jerusalem, 1956; and Encyclopedia Judaica, 1972).
  5. Christians with impairments have often expressed a sense of unwelcomeness when attending church services.
  6. Some Christians, on the other hand, believe that as a result of their religious beliefs, they have a responsibility to care for individuals who are disabled.
  7. As a result, not only the person, but also the entire family is stigmatized as a result of impairment.

Islam

Disabilities are not considered to be the result of wrongdoing on the part of the impaired individual or their parents under Islamic law. Islam considers handicap to be a test posed by Allah himself. In reality, the Qur’an exhorts people to treat those with intellectual impairments with love and to provide protection for those who are handicapped in some way.

Muhammed is shown to treat persons with disabilities with dignity. There is a great emphasis on equality for children and people with special needs in contemporary Islam in Saudi Arabia, which is founded on Islam’s beliefs on disability.

Disability and World Religions

According to the editors, Darla Y. Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus’ book “Disability and World Religions: An Introduction” introduces readers to the rich diversity of the religious traditions found throughout the world – Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Native American traditions. Introducing a specific religious tradition in a way that offers innovative approaches to familiar themes in contemporary debates about religion and disability, including personhood, autonomy, community, ability (including the ability to transcend one’s own limitations), morality (including the interpretation of texts), and conditioned claims about the normal human body or mind, are the goals of each chapter.

The book is part of Baylor University Press’s “Studies in Religion, Theology, and Disability” series, which responds to “the emergence of disability studies as an interdisciplinary endeavor that has impacted theological studies” with “thoughtful reflection on the religious understanding of disability,” according to the Series Introduction.

Religious Accommodation in The United States of America

Readers will learn about the vast range of global faiths, including Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, Confucianism, Daoism, and Native American traditions, in the book “Disability and World Religions: An Introduction” compiled by Darla Y. Schumm and Michael Stoltzfus. Introducing a specific religious tradition in a way that offers innovative approaches to familiar themes in contemporary debates about religion and disability, including personhood, autonomy, community, ability (including the ability to transcend), transcendence (including morality), practice (including the interpretation of texts), and conditioned claims about the normal human body or mind, are the focus of each chapter.

“Studies in Religion, Theology, and Disability” is a series published by Baylor University Press that responds to what the Series Introduction describes as “the emergence of disability studies as an interdisciplinary endeavor that has impacted theological studies” by providing “thoughtful reflection on the religious understanding of disability.”

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Subtopics and Associated Subjects

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U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

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Religious DiscriminationWork Situations

Employers are prohibited from discriminating against any employee in any element of their employment, including hiring and firing, salary, work assignments and promotions; layoffs; training; fringe benefits; and any other term or condition of employment.

Religious DiscriminationHarassment

It is against the law to harass someone because of his or her religious beliefs. Among the forms of harassment are disrespectful statements concerning a person’s religious views or practices, among other things. However, although simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidences that are not particularly serious are not prohibited by law, harassment is criminal when it is so regular and serious that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment, or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted).

An employer’s supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a coworker, or someone who is not an employee of the company, such as a client or customer, can all be harassers of the victim.

Religious Discrimination and Segregation

Employers may not assign an employee to a non-customer contact position based on actual or feared consumer preference under Title VII. Similarly, employers may not assign an employee to a non-customer contact position based on actual or feared customer preference under Title VII.

Religious DiscriminationReasonable Accommodation

Employers may not assign an employee to a non-customer interaction position because of an actual or feared consumer preference under Title VII. Title VII also forbids workplace or employment segregation on the basis of religion (including religious attire and grooming practices).

Religious Accommodation/DressGrooming Policies

An employer must properly accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs or practices unless doing so would impose an excessive hardship on the functioning of the employer’s company. This applies not just to scheduling modifications or time off for religious observances, but also to items like attire and grooming procedures that an employee follows for religious reasons, such as shaving or shaving cream. There are a variety of options, including, for example, wearing certain head coverings or other religious attire (such as a Jewish yarmulke or a Muslim hijab), as well as sporting specific haircuts or facial hair (such as Rastafarian dreadlocks or Sikh uncut hair and beard).

Employees and job applicants who require clothing or grooming accommodations for religious reasons should advise their employers in advance of their need for the accommodation in advance of their need for the accommodation in advance of their hiring.

The employer is required to provide the accommodation if doing so would not result in an unreasonable burden.

Religious DiscriminationReasonable AccommodationUndue Hardship

If accommodating an employee’s religious views or practices would impose an unreasonable burden on the employer, the employer is not required to do so under any circumstances. Unreasonable hardship may result from an accommodation if it is prohibitively expensive, compromises workplace safety, decreases workplace efficiency, infringes on the rights of other employees, or requires other employees to perform more than their fair share of potentially hazardous or burdensome work.

Religious Discrimination And Employment Policies/Practices

As a condition of employment, an employee cannot be forced to engage (or not participate) in a religious activity of his or her choosing.

Employer Coverage

Employees with 15 or more hours

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