What Is Soma In Spirituality? (Solved)

Soma is likened to the Supreme Lord. It stands for all the deities (somah sarva devata) viz. Agni, Apah, Indra, Brihaspati, Pushan, Aditi, Rudra, Varuna and Prajapati. The word ‘soma’ is also equated with friend, fame, ecstasy and affluence. In the sense of moon, it nurtures plants and herbs.

What is the Soma Chakra?

  • The soma chakra is also known as amria chakra, which means „the Nectar of the Crescent Moon.” This chakra is located within the Sahasrara chakra and is found just above the Ajna chakra ( third eye ). This chakra is not as well known as the other chakras, veiled in the shadow of the Ajna chakra and Sahasrara chakra.

What is Soma energy?

Soma refers to Lunar energy, otherwise known as cosmic plasma. It is the subtlest form of matter and makes up the essence of Ojas, an essential energy responsible for vitality, health and wellness. In Vedic tradition, Soma also refers to a drink made from the extract of a mysterious and sacred plant.

What is Soma the god of?

soma, in ancient India, an unidentified plant the juice of which was a fundamental offering of the Vedic sacrifices. The personified deity Soma was the “master of plants,” the healer of disease, and the bestower of riches.

What is Soma sacrifice?

The Somayajna (ISO: Sōmayajña) or Somayaga (ISO: Sōmayāga) or Soma sacrifice is a Hindu ritual. It is a type of yajna performed to appease celestial entities to promote the well-being of all humanity. This ritual is based on methods described in the Vedas.

What is Soma Veda?

Soma is a drink used in ancient India, in the (Vedic) culture. It is written of in the Vedas, in which there are many hymns praising it. It was probably a juice made from a hallucinogenic mountain plant or the haoma plant. In the Vedas, Soma is both the sacred drink and also a god (deva). It is mostly hymns to Soma.

What does Soma mean in Ayurveda?

Etymology. Soma is a Vedic Sanskrit word that literally means ” distill, extract, sprinkle “, often connected in the context of rituals.

Is Soma was the warrior god?

Answer: Answer is TRUE.

What is the Soma good at?

Soma (carisoprodol) is a muscle relaxer that blocks pain sensations between the nerves and the brain. Soma is used together with rest and physical therapy to treat skeletal muscle conditions such as pain or injury.

What are the seven Lokas?

In the Puranas and in the Atharvaveda, there are 14 worlds, seven higher ones (Vyahrtis) and seven lower ones (Pātālas), viz. bhu, bhuvas, svar, mahas, janas, tapas, and satya above and atala, vitala, sutala, rasātala, talātala, mahātala, pātāla and naraka at the bottom.

What is god’s favorite drink?

In mythology, the gods gained their immortality by drinking Soma and it was the favourite tipple of the great god Indra. They then gave the drink to the archer-god Gandharva for safe-keeping but one day Agni, the fire-god, stole it and gave it to the human race.

What is Soma made from?

“The weight of evidence suggests that soma, the ancient ritual drink, has been prepared from the mushrooms of family strophariaceae which contains the unique nervous system stimulator psilocybin.” All researchers agree that ancient Indians and Iranians used for cult purposes a drink containing a psychoactive substance.

What is Soma used for?

Carisoprodol is used short-term to treat muscle pain and discomfort. It is usually used along with rest, physical therapy, and other treatments. It works by helping to relax the muscles.

What are the 5 sacred plants?

Seven of the most sacred plants in the world

  • Lotus Flower.
  • Mistletoe.
  • Holy Basil (Ocimum Sanctum)
  • Peyote.
  • Yew Tree.
  • Marijuana.
  • Basil (Ocimum Basilicum)

Is SOMA a hallucinogen?

Soma: Name given to the mushroom god described in the Rig Veda, which was used in religious ceremonies and has hallucinogenic properties. It is thought by Wasson and others to be the mushroom Amanita muscaria.

What is Soma Sura?

Nearly 4000 years ago, these beverages called Soma (a stimulant) and Sura (beer like beverage) were in vogue. They were meticulously prepared and offered to deities in Soma Yajnas. The book illustrates why the supreme deity Indra was fond of consuming Soma.

soma

Ancient India had a plant called Soma, whose juice was used as a vital gift in Vedic rituals. It is unknown what this plant was. The plant’s stalks were squeezed between stones, and the juice was filtered through sheep’s wool before being blended with water and milk. The process was repeated several times. Following the offering of the soma as an alibation to the gods, the priests and the sacrificer ingested the remainder of the soma that had been left over. It was highly regarded for having an exciting, maybe hallucinatory impact on the user.

This cult bears a lot of striking similarities to the correspondinghaomacult of the ancient Iranians, and it suggests that the ancient Indo-Europeans held comparable beliefs in a form of divine elixir that they shared with the ancient Iranians.

All life and growth were made possible by the pressing of soma, which was coupled with the fertilizing rain that made it all possible.

Matt Stefon has made the most current revisions and updates to this page.

Soma: The Nectar of the Gods — History of Ayurveda

Soma-drinkers may look forward to these pure droplets of Soma mixed with curd as they wind down their evenings with them. Strong Indra, you were born to drink the Soma juice for the sake of preeminence since you were born with flawless strength from birth. The Sage, O Indra, lover of song, may these swift Somas enter thee, and may they bring happiness to thee.— Rig Veda, HYMN V. to Indra. Soma was a plant that was offered to the gods during the time of the Vedic civilization. In and around the facility, there was a significant deal of mysticism and spiritual force.

  1. A number of various varieties of Soma are referenced in the Rig Veda, and Soma is noted as existing in all plants (RV X.97.7), as well as in many other sorts of plants.
  2. In Vedic philosophy, for every manifestation of Agni or Fire, there is an equivalent manifestation of Soma.
  3. Agni and Soma are the Vedic analogues of the yin and yang concepts that are prevalent in Chinese philosophy.
  4. Ephedra is a plant that grows abundantly in Afghanistan and Iran, and it was the primary Soma plant used by the Persians.
  5. While ephedra was probably the most often utilized plant, it was not the only one, and it did not look anything like the Soma plants mentioned in the Rig Veda.
  6. Soma is associated with another form of reed (darbha, Saccharum cylindricum) in this instance, which could have been readily pressed to extract juice in the same way that sugarcane might have been.
  7. In other locations, Soma is associated with kushta (Saussurea lappa), a kind of spicy nervine, as well as with the Ashvattha fig tree, which is claimed to thrive in the Himalayas and is mentioned in the Atharva Veda as a source of inspiration (AV XIX.39.5, 6).

Indra’s HYMN XXVIII is a beautiful piece of music.

Soma was frequently combined with ghee (ghrita) and honey (madhu), and soma was sometimes referred to as madhu (honey or mead).

Also associated with lotuses and other floral water plants is the planet Soma.

He specifies an additional 18 plants, the majority of which are nervine herbs.

1 Soma is a nectar that is released by the pineal gland during profound levels of concentration, and it is used in yogic and spiritual activities.

Soma, on a yogic level, refers to the crown chakra, which is opened by Indra (yogic insight) and causes a torrent of happiness to flow through the body and into the mind.

1 Soma played a major role in vedic rites, spiritual activities, and shamanic medicine, to name a few examples.

It should come as no surprise that Soma has shown itself in a variety of ways, given its transforming nature. Despite the fact that we may never know which plants were really utilized, we may be confident of the awe and regard that Soma was held in ancient times.

Sources

These pure droplets of Soma, mixed with curd, are brought to the Soma-attention drinker’s at night for his satisfaction. Strong Indra, you were born to drink the Soma juice for the sake of preeminence since you were born with flawless strength at birth. The Sage, O Indra, lover of song, may these swift Somas enter thee, and may they bring happiness to thee.—Rig Veda, HYMN V. to Indra. Soma was a plant that was offered to the gods during the Vedic period. In and around the factory, there was a strong sense of mysticism and spiritual force.

  • Several distinct forms of Soma are referenced in the Rig Veda, and the Rig Veda mentions that Soma is found in all plants (RV X.97.7).
  • In Vedic philosophy, there is a kind of Soma for every manifestation of Agni or Fire.
  • According to Chinese philosophy, Agni and Soma are the Vedic counterparts of yin and yang.
  • Historically, Ephedra was the primary Soma plant used by the Persians, and it grows abundantly in Afghanistan and Iran.
  • Ephedra was neither the only plant utilized, nor did it match the Soma plants mentioned in the Rig Veda, despite the fact that it was the most popular.
  • Soma is associated with another form of reed (darbha, Saccharum cylindricum) in this instance, which could have been readily crushed to obtain a juice, similar to how sugarcane is processed now.
  • According to the Atharva Veda, Soma is associated with kushta (Saussurea lappa), a kind of spicy nervine, as well as the Ashvattha fig tree, which is thought to thrive in the Himalayas (AV XIX.39.5, 6).

INDRA’S HYMN NO.

It was common practice to combine soma with ghee (ghrita) and honey (madhu), and soma was frequently referred to as madhu (honey or mead).

Soma has also been linked to lotuses and other blooming aquatic plants, according to some scholars.

Additionally, he names 18 plants in total, the majority of which are nervines.

1 A nectar released by the pineal gland during profound stages of concentration, Soma is revered in yogic and spiritual activities.

The term “soma” alludes to the crown chakra, which is opened by Indra (yogic insight) and causes a flood of happiness to flow over the entire body.

1 As a major component of vedic rites, spiritual activities, and shamanic medicine, soma played a vital role.

Soma has shown itself in a variety of ways, which is understandable given its transforming nature. While we may never know which plants were utilized in the ritual, we can be confident that Soma was held in high regard in ancient civilizations.

Etymology

SOMA is a Vedic Sanskrit term that literally translates as “distill, extract, sprinkle,” and it’s most commonly used in the context of religious rites. Thehaoma is thehaoma’s savestancognate. The term is derived from Indo-Iranian roots*sav-(Sanskritsav-/su) “to press,” i.e.,*sau-ma-is the drink made by pressing the stalks of a plant; nevertheless, the word and associated practices were taken from the Bactria–Margiana Culture by the Indo-Aryans, according to Geldner (1951). (BMAC). Despite the fact that the term is only found in Indo-Iranian traditions, Manfred Mayrhofer has claimed that the word derives from a Proto-Indo-European origin.

Origins

SOMA is a Vedic Sanskrit term that literally translates as “distill, extract, sprinkle,” and it’s most frequently used in the context of religious rites. Thehaoma is Soma’s savestancognate. The term is derived from Indo-Iranian roots*sav-(Sanskritsav-/su) “to press,” i.e.,*sau-ma-is the drink made by pressing the stalks of a plant; nevertheless, the word and associated practices were taken by the Indo-Aryans from the Bactria–Margiana Culture, according to Geldner (1951). (BMAC). Because of this, Manfred Mayrhofer has claimed that the term derives from the root of Indo-Iranian traditions, rather than from the root of Indo-Iranian cultures.

Vedic soma

In the Vedas, the same term (soma) is used to refer to the beverage, the plant, and the god associated with it. Drinking soma can grant you immortality (Amrita, Rigveda 8.48.3). Indra and Agni are shown as ingesting huge amounts of soma in their respective roles. When Indra was fighting the snake demon Vritra, according to vedic tradition, he drank copious amounts of soma. The use of soma by human beings has been clearly documented in Vedic ritual for centuries. When the soma is crushed, squeezed, combined with water and milk, and put into vessels, the Soma Mandala of the Rigveda is centered on that point in the ritual when the soma is poured into the containers.

  1. The most well-known tale surrounding Soma is that he was a thief.
  2. Having successfully evaded Knu’s capture, a falcon abducted Soma and transported her to Manu, the first sacrificer.
  3. Srya, the Sun’s daughter, is sometimes referred to as Soma’s wife, but this is not always the case.
  4. Jamison and Joel P.
  5. To put it another way, Swami Dayanand Saraswati says, “Good fruit-containing meal, not any intoxicating beverage, we drink you.” You become the elixir of life, gain physical strength or the light of God, and gain power over your senses.
  6. God, what can even the most violent of individuals do to me?
  7. The blind man sees, and the lame man takes the first step.

Allow him to reclaim what was previously lost; allow him to propel the man of truth ahead.” This is suggestive of an encounter with an entheogen derived from a particular source. (Historian Michael Wood narrates) (From “The Story of India” to “The History of India”)

Avestan haoma

TheAvesta (especially in theHm Yast, Yasna 9) provides a peek into the last stages ofhaomainZoroastrianism, and theAvestan language*hauma has survived asMiddle Persianhm. The planthaomay produced the vital component for the ceremonial drink, parahaoma, which was harvested from the plant. In Yasna 9.22, haoma offers “speed and strength to warriors, excellent and righteous sons to those who give birth, spiritual power and wisdom to those who commit themselves to the study of the nasks,” as well as “excellent and righteous sons to those who give birth.” Due to his status as the religion’s principal cult god, he came to be regarded as the religion’s divine priest.

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Post-Vedic mentions

Soma is mentioned in Chapter 9, verse 20 of the Bhagavad Gita: “Those who perform actions (as described in the three Vedas), desiring fruit from these actions, and those who drink the juice of the pure Soma plant, are cleansed and purified of their past sins.” Those who perform actions (as described in the three Vedas), desiring fruit from these actions, and those who drink the juice of the pure Soma plant, are cleansed and purified of Those who seek heaven (the Abode of the Lord, also known as Indralok) will find it and experience its exquisite joys by worshipping me and making sacrifices to me in return for their devotion.

As a result, by engaging in good deeds (Karma), as prescribed by the three Vedas, one will always unquestionably be granted a position in paradise, where they will be able to partake in all of the glorious pleasures that the Deities are able to experience.

Candidates for the plant

There has been a great deal of discussion about the genesis of theSaumaplant. Honey, mushrooms, hallucinogenic plants, and other herbal plants have all been cited as potential candidates. Thesomalatha (Sanskrit: soma creeper, Sarcostemma acidum) is the plant utilized in the ritual ofsomayajna, which is being practiced today in South India by traditionalSrautas known asSomayajis. Thesomalatha is obtained as a leafless vine from the Sarcostemma acidum plant. Since the late 18th century, when Abraham Hyacinthe Anquetil-Duperron and others made portions of the Avesta available to western scholars, several scholars have sought a botanical equivalent of thehaomaas described in the texts and as used in contemporary Zoroastrian practice in order to create a representative botanical equivalent of thehaomaas.

  • During the colonial British era study, cannabis was offered as a candidate for soma by Jogesh Chandra Ray in his book The Soma Plant (1939) and by B.
  • Mukherjee in his book The Soma Plant (1940).
  • Several experiments were conducted in the late 1960s to determine whether soma was a psychoactive drug.
  • Gordon Wasson, an amateurethnomycologist, presented a number of recommendations, including one in 1968 in which he argued that somawawas an inebriant but not cannabis and recommended the fly-agaric mushroom,Amanita muscaria, as a possible option.
  • Wasson and his co-author, Wendy Doniger O’Flaherty, identified links between Vedic descriptions of the fly-agaric inshamanicritual and accounts of its usage in Siberian shamanic rituals.
  • Falk (1989) defined formalized adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial adverbial ad As Jan E.

Houben summarizes the findings of the 1999 Haoma-Soma workshop in Leiden, he says that “despite vigorous attempts to do away with ephedra by those who are ready to see sauma as a hallucinogen, its standing as a serious contender for the Rigvedic Soma and Avestan Haoma continues to stand.” In 2003, Houben et al.

He said that remnants and seed imprints left behind during the manufacture of soma had been discovered in the vessels examined.

Instead, Mark Merlin, who returned to the issue of the identification of soma more than thirty years after first writing about it, claimed that additional research into the relationship between soma and the plant Papaver somniferum is required (Merlin, 2008).

The failure of both Wasson’s and his own attempts to achieve a psychedelic state while taking Amanita muscaria as proof that it could not have inspired the adulation and adoration of soma are cited by McKenna in support of his claim.

McKenna further points out that the 9th mandala of the Rig Veda has several allusions to the cow as the embodiment of soma, which he believes to be the case. As described by Michael Wood, anentheogenic experiences include references to immortality and brightness.

See also

  • On the subject of the originalSaumaplant, there has been significant debate. Hives, mushrooms, hallucinogenic and other herbal plants have all been cited as possible candidates. Today, the plant employed in the somayajna ceremony is thesomalatha (Sanskrit: soma creeper, Sarcostemma acidum), which is purchased as a leafless vine and performed by the traditionalSrautas known asSomayajis in South India’s Kutch region. A representative botanical analogue of thehaomaas mentioned in the scriptures and employed in contemporary Zoroastrian practice has been sought by numerous academics since the late 18th century, when Abraham Hyacinthe Anquetil-Duperronand others made sections of the Avesta available to western scholars. After being exposed to ephedra, which was locally called ashumorhoma and which they exported to the Indian Zoroastrians in the late nineteenth century, the very conservative Zoroastrians of Yazd (Iran) were found to be using it. When cannabis was offered as a candidate for soma during the colonial British era academically, it was done so by Jogesh Chandra Ray in his book The Soma Plant (1939) and by B. L. Mukherjee in his book The Soma Plant (1940). (1921). Several investigations were conducted in the late 1960s to determine whether or not soma was a psychoactive drug. The American bankerR. Gordon Wasson, an amateurethnomycologist, presented a number of recommendations, including one in 1968 in which he argued that somawa was an inebriant but not cannabis and recommended the fly-agaric mushroom,Amanita muscaria, as a possible option. Since its inception in the anthropological literature in 1968, this hypothesis has acquired both opponents and supporters. W. Doniger O’Flaherty, Wasson’s co-author, observed links between Vedic descriptions of the fly-agaric inshamanicritual and reports of its employment in Siberian shamanistic rituals. It was noted in 1989 by Harry Falk that the books’ claims that both haoma andsomawould increase alertness and awareness did not correspond to the consciousness changing effects of anentheogen, and that “there is nothing shamanistic or visionary about either the early Vedic or the Old Iranian literature” (Falk, 1989) The three species of ephedra that generate the drug ephedrine (Ephedra gerardiana,Ephedra major procera, andEphedra intermedia) have the same qualities as those described tohaoma in the Avesta texts, according to Falk’s findings. Falk (1989) defined formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formal As Jan E. M. Houben summarizes the findings of the 1999 Haoma-Soma workshop in Leiden, he says that “despite vigorous attempts to do away with ephedra by those who are ready to see sauma as a hallucinogen, its standing as a credible contender for the Rigvedic Soma and Avestan Haoma still exists.” In 2003, Houben published an article stating that Vessels and mortars used to make soma at Zoroastrian temples in the Bactria–Margiana Archeological Complex, according to a report written by Soviet archeologistViktor Sarianidi He stated that residues and seed imprints left behind during the manufacturing of soma had been discovered in the jars. He explained that the vessels had been cleaned. Further study has found that this is not the case. A different viewpoint was expressed by Mark Merlin, who, more than thirty years after first writing on soma, returned to the issue and declared that more research into the relationship between soma and Papaver somniferum was required (Merlin, 2008). EthnobotanistTerence McKenna hypothesizes in his bookFood of the Gods that the mushroomPsilocybe cubensis is the most plausible candidate for soma, because it grows in cow dung in specific regions and has hallucinogenic effects when eaten. Both Wasson’s and his own ineffective attempts to induce a psychedelic experience with Amanita muscaria are cited by McKenna as proof that soma could not have been the inspiration for the veneration and adoration of amanita muscaria. The cow is described extensively in the Rig Veda’s ninth mandala, according to McKenna, who also points out that cows are considered to be the incarnation of soma in many other traditions. In the opinion of Michael Wood, the references to immortality and light are features of the anentheogenic experience.

Notes

  1. For a review of writings on this subject up to 1997, see Kuzmina (2007), The Origin of the Indo-Iranians, p. 339. Trai-vidya m soma-p pta-p yajair ihv svar-gati te puyam ahnanti divyan divi deva-bhogn
  2. Trai-vidya m soma-p pt

References

  1. CollinsDictionary.com provides a definition for soma. Collins English Dictionary – Complete Unabridged 11th Edition (Collins English Dictionary – Complete Unabridged). Flood (1996), An Introduction to Hinduism, p.43
  2. Flood (1996), An Introduction to Hinduism, p.43
  3. The Bhagavad Gita is known as “The Song of God.” Mukundananda has provided the translation. Isbn978-0-9833967-2-7.WikidataQ108659922
  4. Jagadguru Kripaluji Yog, Chapter 9, Verse 20.ISBN978-0-9833967-2-7.WikidataQ108659922 Toorn, Karel van der
  5. Becking, Bob
  6. Horst, Pieter Willem van der
  7. Toorn, Karel van der
  8. Becking, Bob (1999). The Bible’s Deities and Demons are included in this dictionary. Eerdmans Publishing. ISBN 978-0-8028-2491-2. Page 384. Retrieved on January 24, 2021
  9. Guenon, René (2004). Sacred Science is represented via symbols. Retrieved on January 24, 2021 from Sophia Perennis, page 320 of ISBN978-0-900588-77-8. Victor Sarianidi,Viktor Sarianidi,Viktor Sarianidiin The Story of India: A PBS Documentary
  10. AbSingh, N. P. The Story of India: A PBS Documentary (1988). Flora of Eastern Karnataka, Volume 1, Mittal Publications, p. 416.ISBN9788170990673
  11. Monier Monier-Williams, Flora of Eastern Karnataka, Volume 1, Mittal Publications, p. 416.ISBN9788170990673
  12. (1872). A Sanskrit-to-English Dictionary has been created. pages. 1136–1137
  13. K.F.Geldner, Der Rig-Veda, Oxford University Press (Reprint: 2001). M. Mayrhofer, Etymological Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen, Heidelberg 1986–2000, vol II: 748
  14. AbcBeckwith 2011, p. 32
  15. AbcAnthony 2007, pages. 454–455
  16. AbcBeckwith (18 August 2006). The Sacred Space of Indo-European Civilization: Vedic and Roman Cult Pages 242–242 of University of Illinois Press’s book 2007
  17. Kusmina 2007, p. 319
  18. AbAnthony 2007, p. 462
  19. Anthony 2007, p. 454
  20. Stephanie Jamison 2007
  21. ISBN 978-0-252-09295-4 (2015). The Rigveda is considered to be India’s first religious poetry. “UT College of Liberal Arts: UT College of Liberal Arts”, Oxford University Press, pp. 42–43, ISBN 978-0190633394
  22. “UT College of Liberal Arts: UT College of Liberal Arts”, Oxford University Press, pp. 42–43, ISBN 978-0190633394
  23. Liberalarts.utexas.edu. Stephanie Jamison was able to get a hold of the information on 2018-10-04. (2015). The Rigveda is considered to be India’s first religious poetry. Oxford University Press, p. 1129, ISBN 978-0190633394
  24. O’Flaherty, Wendy Doniger, p. 1129, ISBN 978-0190633394
  25. (Translator). The Rig Veda is a Hindu religious text. Penguin Books, London, 1981, page 121
  26. Bhagavad Gita on Indra Ch 10 verse 22
  27. Williamson, Lola, et al., eds., Penguin Books, London, 1981, page 121
  28. (January 2010). Transcendent in the United States of America.ISBN9780814794708. Retrieved on February 23, 2015
  29. Hendel v World Plan Executive Council, 124 WLR 957 (January 2, 1996)
  30. Affd 705 A.2d 656, 667 (DC, 1997)
  31. Oldenberg, Hermann, 124 WLR 957 (January 2, 1996)
  32. (1988). The Religion of the Veda, ISBN 978-81-208-0392-3
  33. Ray, Jogesh, Chandra, Soma Plant, Indian Historical Quarterly, vol. 15, no. 2, June, 1939, Calcutta
  34. Mukherjee, B. L., The Soma Plant, JRAS, (1921), Idem, The Soma Plant, Calcutta, (1922)
  35. Furst, Peter T., The Soma Plant, JRAS (1976). Hallucinogens and the Study of Culture Chandler Sharpe, pages. 96–108, ISBN 0-88316-517-1
  36. John Brough, pp. 96–108, ISBN 0-88316-517-1 (1971). “Soma and the mushroom “Amanita muscaria””. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies.34(2): 331–362.doi: 10.1017/S0041977X0012957X.JSTOR612695
  37. Feeney, Kevin (2020).”Fly Agaric: A Compendium of History, Pharmacology, Mythology, and Exploration.” Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies.34(2): 331–362.doi: 10.1017/S0041977X0012957 ResearchGate, retrieved on December 27, 2020
  38. (Wasson, Robert Gordon, “Soma: Divine Mushroom of Immortality,” published in 1968.) • C.C. Bakels’ Ethno-Mycological Studies (New York: Springer-Verlag, ISBN 0-15-683800-1)
  39. (2003). A report on the contents of a ceramic vessel discovered in the “white room” of the Gonur Temenos, Merv Oasis, Turkmenistan, is available online here. Michael Wood, The Story of India
  40. Mark Merlin, Man and Marijuana, (Barnes and Noble, 1972)
  41. Mark Merlin, Archaeological Record for Ancient Old World Use of Psychoactive Plants, Economic Botany, 57(3): (2008)
  42. Mark Merlin, Man and Marijuana
  43. Michael Wood, The Story of India
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Sources

  • Anthony, David W. (2007), (2007), The horse, the wheel, and the language are all important. A History of Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes and Their Influence on the Modern World, Princeton University Press
  • Bakels, C.C. 2003
  • Princeton University Press. Heesterman, Jan (2009), Empires of the Silk Road, Princeton University Press
  • Beckwith, Christopher I. (2009), Empires of the Silk Road, Princeton University Press
  • Heesterman, Jan (2009), The Bactria-Margiana Archaeological Complex, Turkmenistan
  • And Heesterman, Jan (2009), Empires of the Silk Road, Princeton University Press (2005). “Vedism and Brahmanism” are two terms used to describe two different religions. Lindsay Jones’s book (ed.). The Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 14, is a reference work on religion (2nd ed.). pages. 9552–9553 in Macmillan Reference, New York. ISBN0-02-865733-0
  • Jay and Mike, please. The Search for Soma in the Blue Tide. Autonomedia, 1999
  • Kuz’mina, Elena Efimovna (2007), J. P. Mallory (ed. ), The Origin of the Indo-Iranians, J. P. Mallory (ed. ), The Origin of the Indo-Iranians, J. P. Mallory (ed. ), The Origin of the Indo-Iranians, J. P. Mallory (ed. ), The Origin of the Indo-Iranians Peter Lamborn Wilson is published by Brill with the ISBN 978-9004160545. The quest for Irish Soma is underway, and the clouds are being ploughed. Singh, Upinder (City Lights, 1999)
  • Singh, Upinder (2008). From the Stone Age through the 12th century, a history of ancient and early medieval India is presented. ISBN 978-81-317-1120-0
  • Published by Pearson Education India.

The Flow of Soma

Soma and Ananda are a couple from India. The Soma offering, in which specially prepared plant juices are offered into the holy fire (Agni) as the drink of the Devas, is the culmination of the Vedic ritual. This is the most important part of the ceremony. Nonetheless, this old ritual symbolizes a deeper interior ritual or alchemy of consciousness, which is the true significance of the ceremony. Many mysteries of the practice of Yoga will be revealed to us as we investigate this process further.

  • In the outer world, soma manifests itself as water in its different forms on the ground and in the sky, as the sap of plants, the vital fluids of animals, and even the waters (vibratory field) of space.
  • Soma lives within us as a psychological principle of emotion, love, and inspiration, as well as as the source of our own creativity, which manifests itself in a variety of ways.
  • When in a state of meditation, the brain and mind spontaneously secrete a specific sort of Soma, or nectar of peace and satisfaction, that represents the spiritual Soma that is being experienced.
  • As the prima materia (fundamental material) that underlies everything, Soma (or Ananda) is the source of all creation.
  • In order to comprehend Soma, we must first comprehend Agni, the principle of fire, light, or energy, which is its polar opposite.
  • On the surface, they are symbolic of the main elements of fire and water, but their underlying meaning is far more profound.
  • Indeed, Lord Shiva, the greatest Godhead, is considered to be Agni-Somatmakam, or both Agni and Soma in nature, according to Hindu tradition and scripture.

In nature, his left side represents Soma, which may be watery, delicate, or feminine.

In the Vedic tradition, Agni signifies light (Jyoti) in its fullest sense, which includes the light of perception as well as the light of awareness, rather than merely light as a physical principle.

The term “Soma” refers not just to water, but also to the mind and, ultimately, to the reflecting potential of awareness itself in this context.

It has an oily characteristic that may be used to nurture and maintain a flame.

All of the items that we encounter serve as fuel for the fire of our consciousness.

Everything we observe is like to a flower, from which we can extract the honey of ecstasy (or happiness).

Exceptional yogis may access them through their subtle bodies (the linga or fire body) and roam freely across all of the realms, finding nutrition and joy in whatever they encounter.

Essentially, Agni is the fire of consciousness (Chidagni), which is mirrored in the Soma, or water of happiness, at the most fundamental level.

Delight in the Absence of Things This is the ultimate level of Soma because it is the happiness inherent in life itself (Brahman), rather than the pleasure caused by interaction with other objects.

Consequently, any enjoyment that is dependent on touch with an external item must be transient and must eventually terminate in suffering.

Taking the state of the observer (sakshi-bhava) allows us to attain this, as it delivers the pleasure of perception while avoiding the anguish of engagement.

We are all looking for happiness in some manner throughout our lives.

This need for Soma is inherent in the soul, which is ever on the lookout for a way back to its source in God.

At the end of the day, this essence, or rasa, is pure joy.

The Self is considered to be the fluidity of water, the heat of fire, the power to move of the wind, the holding force of the ground, and the pervading power of space.

Soma is the name given to this one-of-a-kind essence.

A person’s Self is their own eye, their own ear, their own mind.

It is the absolute truth of all truths.

We can distinguish the heart or core of all things by means of the light emitted by the purification filter (pavitra) in the heart, which is where this extraction process takes place.

The seer (Agni) and the seen (Soma) are two different aspects of the Yoga of Knowledge (Jnana Yoga).

The visible is the field illumined by light, which is essentially nothing more than light or awareness reflected from beyond the observer.

If our vision is clear, it has the potential to reveal the Soma or Ananda that is buried inside all we perceive.

This is the secret to the alchemy of Jnana (Self-knowledge), which is that everything we look at with our complete concentration will give Soma or ecstasy, not in the form of outward pleasure, but rather in the form of the happiness of the Self itself.

This is the condition of Samadhi, which is characterized by the flow of Soma on an intracellular level.

Self-inquiry teaches us to look at our inner selves in their whole and completely, and the joy inherent in the Self must emerge as the ultimate Soma or self-delight as a result of our practice of Self-inquiry.

There are five sheaths, or koshas, in yoga that date back to the Taittiriya Upanishad and have been taught for centuries.

Each has an analogous form of Soma, which serves as the primary fuel for the device. Agni represents the eater or the enjoyer, whereas Soma represents the food or substance that is relished.

  1. Physically, the Agni is represented by the digestive fire (Jathargni), while the Soma is represented by the food and drink we take in via our mouths. Among the more tangible manifestations of Soma are specially formulated rejuvenating meals, beverages, and herbs that may be used to refresh the body, brain, and nerve system. Our vital enjoyments of exercise and activity are the Agni at the pranic or vital level (Pranamaya kosha), whereas Pranagni, or the vital fire, is the Agni at the pranic or vital level (Pranamaya kosha). Higher Pranic forms of Soma, like as Pranayama techniques, can revive our internal Pranas and balance their energies in the direction of change. The mental fire (Manasika Agni) is the Agni at the level of the outside or sensory mind (Manomaya kosha), and our numerous sensory pleasures are the Soma at the level of the outer or sensory mind. Soma is manifested in higher mental forms like as mantras, visualizations, and meditations, all of which bring a higher degree of experience into the mind. Among the many levels of consciousness (Vijnanamaya Kosha) is the Buddhi, or discerning intelligence, which is represented by the Agni. The Soma represents the numerous principles, beliefs, and ideas that we follow in our lives, which are represented by the Agni. Soma for the higher mind can take the shape of formless thoughts on truth, oneness, happiness, and harmony, among other things. When we consider the soul (Jiva or Anandamaya kosha), the Agni represents our inner consciousness (Chitta), and the Soma represents our complete life’s experiences and memories (Samsara). It requires certain sorts of Soma, such as the practice of Self-inquiry, in which we digest our life experiences, burning away our Samskaras (internal karmic inclinations), and turning them into pure consciousness
  2. It also requires specific types of Soma, such as the practice of Self-inquiry.

In this way, the soul, or Jiva, absorbs elements, feelings, and ideas from the exterior world and extracts the nectar of Ananda from them, in the same way that a bee collects pollen from various flowers and transforms it into honey, as described in the Bhagavad-Gita. After all is said and done, the substance of our experience (rasa) becomes the Ananda or Soma Kosha, which is the repository for all of our past and present actions (karma and samskaras). Awakened individuals may transform their whole experience, even their grief, into Soma or Ananda via the cultivation of the fire of awareness (awakened consciousness).

  1. Yoga’s Agni and Soma, as well as the Practice of Yoga Yoga practitioners refer to Agni as the flaming Kundalini power that resides in the root chakra, also known as the earth chakra.
  2. Soma is the fluid nectar that resides in the crown chakra, also known as the head chakra.
  3. Soma ascends in tandem with Agni’s ascent.
  4. It is said in the Yoga tradition that the crown chakra (Chandra Kanda) is the zone of the Moon or Soma, and that the bottom three chakras are the regions of fire and water (Prana) (Agni-Kanda).
  5. The thousand currents of the crown chakra, also known as the Sahasrara or thousand petalled lotus, are responsible for this.
  6. Yoga practice is critical in achieving a healthy balance between these two energy centers.
  7. Agni signifies the upward striving of the soul in the direction of the divine, whereas Soma represents the falling grace of the Divine.

The reason for this is that the fire element (Agni) is represented by an upward-facing triangle, whereas water (Soma) is represented by a downward-facing triangle.

The major upward journey of the soul is represented by this symbol.

Similarly, The main downward movement of grace is represented by this symbol.

It is the finest, easiest, and most direct means of opening oneself up to the flow of grace while also achieving the utmost joy (Bhakti Yoga).

A well-balanced practice should take into consideration both the Agni and the Soma parts of the practice.

It entails enhancing the mind’s ability to investigate, observe, penetrate, and modify the world around it.

Knowledge (Jnana) is comparable to a flame, whereas devotion (Bhakti) is comparable to oil (ghee).

It will simply burn up the wick if there isn’t enough oil to keep the flame going. A mind that does not have that flow of grace or devotion, on the other hand, can be consumed or dried out by the flame of knowledge. We must remember to keep our Soma flowing at all times.

Soma

When the Hindu gods and their ancient priests, thebrahmanas, performed ceremonies, it was thought that they drank somawa, which was a fermented juice drink made from fruit juice. It was believed to be an elixir, and its ingestion not only healed illnesses but also brought enormous wealth. It is personified by the god of the same name, who is also the god of sacrifices and who, according to certain scriptures, is related with the Moon. Soma is also represented by the moon. The drink is notably mentioned and extolled in aMandala of the holy Hindu literature, theRigveda, which may be found in the British Museum.

The Drink Soma

Soma juice, which may have been initially used in ancientPersia, is said to have been made from the fermented milky sap of Asclepias acida, a climbing plant that flourishes in mountainous regions. Aside from hallucinogenic mushrooms and honey, other suggestions for the drink’s origin or partial constituents include cannabis, blue lotus blossoms, milk, and pomegranate juice. In legend, the gods achieved immortality by the use of Soma, which was also the preferred beverage of the powerful deity Indra.

Not only was it drank by priests because of its sacred character, but it was also believed to have elevating properties, providing the drinker with an increase in energy and alertness.

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It was also extensively used in libations to the gods, which were presented by believers.

The God Soma

Traditionally, the drink was personified as the god Soma, who was considered to be the most powerful of the gods and a bringer of health and wealth; in many ways, he is similar to the Greek and Roman gods of wine, Dionysos and Bacchus, while in those traditions, the drink is considered to be the equivalent of ambrosia. Soma is also revered as the deity who oversees Hindu religious sacrifices, and he is associated with the direction North-east, according to Hindu tradition. In the Puranasreligious writings, Soma is shown as riding a chariot with three wheels, driven by a team of 10 pure-white horses, on which he is portrayed as riding.

In thePuranas, Soma appears as the moon-god in a number of different puranas, frequently with contradictory accounts of his attributes.

Another version of the story states that Soma was produced when the planet was initially created from the churning of the milky ocean.

In addition, he is classified as a warrior of thekshatriyacaste and as a priest of thebrahmancaste, which is a bit confused. Soma’s sweetheart in the Vedas was Sita, the daughter of Savita, the Sun, but his most renowned companions are Rohini and Tara, according to the Vedas.

SomaRohini

Traditionally, the drink was personified as the god Soma, who was considered to be the most powerful of the gods and a bringer of health and wealth; in many ways, he is similar to the Greek and Roman gods of wine, Dionysos and Bacchus, and in those traditions, the drink is considered to be the equivalent of ambrosia. Soma is also revered as the deity who oversees Hindu religious sacrifices, and he is associated with the direction North-east, according to Hindu belief. It is written in the Puranas that Soma is riding achariot with three wheels, drawn by a herd of ten pure-white horses, and that this is how Soma appears in the sacred books.

In the Puranas, Soma appears as the moon-god in a number of different puranas, frequently with contradictory explanations of what he represents.

Another version of the story states that Soma was produced when the planet was initially created by the churning of the milky ocean.

Although Soma was a lover of Sita (the daughter of Savita, the Sun), his most renowned partners are Rohini and Tara, according to the Vedic literature.

SomaTara

Another well-known event from Hindu mythology has the amorous Soma abducting Tara, the wife of Brhaspati, the god-priest who served as a messenger and connection between humans and the gods. Because of his capture of Tara, Soma instigated a battle between gods and demons (asura), which was only brought to a stop by the intervention of the mightyBrahma. In the end, Tara was reunited with her family, but not before she became pregnant with Soma’s son Budha (not to be confused with Buddha, the personification of the planet Mercury and father of the Lunar race), who was born to her while she was in captivity.

Prior to publication, this paper was checked for correctness, dependability, and conformance to academic standards by two independent reviewers.

The Psychological Meaning of Soma

Once again in a well-known event from Hindu mythology, the amorous Soma abducted Tara, the wife of Brhaspati, the god-priest who served as the messenger and intermediary between humans and the gods. The asuras (demons) were provoked into an all-out attack on Tara, which was only brought to a halt by the intervention of the powerful Brahma. In the end, Tara was reunited with her family, but not before she became pregnant with Soma’s son Budha (not to be confused with Buddha, the personification of the planet Mercury and father of the Lunar race), who was born to her.

This definition sparked your interest. Prior to publication, this article was checked for correctness, dependability, and compliance with academic standards.

References

U. A. Asrani’s The Psychology of Mysticism is available online. 2012, 2nd edition of The Highest State of Consciousness by John White (ed.). White Crow Publishing. (The original version of this article appeared in Main Currents in Modern Thought, volume 25, pages 68–73, in 1969.) Raja Choudhury is the author of this work. Soma: The Psychedelic Origins of Religious Experience (Psychedelic Origins of Religious Experience) The video was shot on August 27, 2015. David Frawley is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom.

  1. It is called the American Institute of Vedic Studies.
  2. David Frawley is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom.
  3. The American Institute of Vedic Studies will have its annual conference on November 4, 2020.
  4. 2, Benares, 1897.
  5. H.
  6. 2, Benares, 1897.
  7. Maslow.

Viking Publishing Company, New York, 1971.

Ch.

Notes on Being-Psychology, pages.

D., ed.).

Sahapedia is an encyclopedia of knowledge (website).

Margiana and Soma-Haoma are two characters in the game.

Soma and the Sacred Feminine: Reflections from Ancient Indian Myth

In addition to being a scholar of Sanskrit narrative (Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies), Dr. Raj Balkaran is also a practicing spiritual seeker who founded the online School of Indian Wisdom in which he shares knowledge of ancient India’s philosophical, mythological, and spiritual traditions with students worldwide. Raj Balkaran, Ph.D.’s most recent blog entries (see all) Soma. “SO-ma,” you say out loud. Yes, it does seem to slide right off the tongue. It has long been connected with psychedelic culture, according to the wonderful old Sanskrit term “sadhana.” Why?

An unknown period of time during the second millennium BCE saw the compilation of a number of Vedic Sanskrit hymns into what is now known as the g Veda.

It dates back to 1500–2000 BCE and is the world’s oldest extant composition in any Indo-European language.

For the most part, the most often invoked deities are Indra, the heroic commander of the gods, Agni, the fire god and Soma, the deity of a vision-inducing magico-medicinal mixture made from plants known by the same name.

Soma is both a plant and a brew, as well as the Vedic god who personifies both, and to whom a whole Book of the g Veda (which contains 114 hymns) is devoted in honor of both.

Soma: The Magico-Medicinal Plant

So, what kind of plant is the soma plant, exactly? If you’re seeking for a clear-cut solution to this issue, keep looking—and stay away from anyone who claims to have the answer in advance of your search. The narratives are contradictory, and the term “Soma” might refer to any of a slew of concoctions that have been utilized for hundreds of years. It’s similar to the word “wine”—is that chardonnay? Merlot? What about ice wine? Beaujolais? Was it really true that grapes are the source of all wine, as you claim?

  • What about a glass of plum wine?
  • However, we know that the plant was crushed between stones, passed through sheep’s wool, and combined with various ingredients like as water, milk, and honey to create the final product.
  • In the Vedic fire sacrifice, it was presented to the gods as a libation to them, and it was also eaten by the priests and the sacrificer.
  • “When correctly prepared, would elicit hallucinogenic, euphoric, and energetic states, which were probably used for religious experiences, healing, and rites of passage,” according to the researchers.

Soma: The Vedic God

It is impossible to list all of Soma’s attributes, but he is master of plants, healer of sickness, provider of wealth, and—most importantly—provider of immortality to the gods. He is revered as marvelous, intelligent, and great, and he is commended for being both valiant and sagacious at the same time. Soma is summoned in a variety of ways, including as a guardian, bard, enlightener, strengthener, and first and foremost friend of the gods. As the personification of soma, he is lauded as immortal, unending, as sweet as ambrosia itself, and even as the ruler of life himself.

Masculine and Feminine Principles

He possesses a wide range of abilities, including mastery of plants, disease-curing abilities, the ability to bestow riches, and, perhaps most crucially, the ability to grant immortality to gods. He is seen as marvelous, smart, and powerful, and he is lauded for being both valiant and sagacious in his actions and words. It is common to hear Soma’s name invoked as a guardian, bard, enlightener, strengthener, and first and foremost friend of the gods, among other things.

Soma personified, he is revered as immortal and unending; he is praised for being the embodiment of ambrosia itself, and even as the ruler of life. Soma is, in my opinion, the most prominent embodiment of feminine qualities in the Vedic universe, which is particularly relevant to our subject.

Soma: The Vedic Face of the Feminine

Soma is recognized as a child of the rivers in Vedic tradition, where she represents the feminine face. It should come as no surprise that the water element is connected with the archetypal feminine: being the energy opposite of fire, water gives room for all things to come together, whereas fire devours everything in its path. The amniotic relationship, as well as the connection between the feminine, the moon, and the female reproductive cycle, is significant in this instance. Soma is also known as the great nourisher, which is another feminine job that may be performed by either males or females, according to tradition.

  1. Soma, the celestial equivalent of a mother’s breastmilk, provides ambrosia to the gods in order for them to be sustained for eternity.
  2. Soma is an old Vedic concept that predates the later concept of akti (the Goddess) as the source of strength for the male gods and the entirety of the cosmos.
  3. Indra must rescue the waters of the planet from the clutches of Vtra in order to ensure the well-being of everybody.
  4. As lofty as the soma that empowers him is the fact that he imbibes the feminine force within himself as soma in order to unleash it without himself as rain.
  5. ” Consequently, he symbolizes and integrates both the masculine and feminine perspectives.
  6. Despite this strongly feminine portrayal, the fact that Soma is a male deity is hardly surprising, considering the macho, patriarchal Aryan civilization that venerates him in the first place.
  7. The same may be true about persons who are thus inclined, regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, or other characteristics.

Dawn and twilight, in addition to the dominance of day and night, are significant moments.

Right vs. Left Brain

It is said that Soma is a water kid, because she represents the feminine face of Vedic mythology. It should come as no surprise that the water element is connected with the archetypal feminine: being the energy opposite of fire, water gives room for all things to come together, whereas fire consumes everything in its path. The amniotic relationship, as well as the connection between the feminine, the moon, and the female reproductive cycle, is significant in this context. Also known as the great nourisher, Soma performs another feminine job that may be performed by both men and women.

Soma, the celestial equivalent of a mother’s breastmilk, provides ambrosia to the gods in order for them to be sustained forever.

Soma is an early Vedic concept that predates the later concept of akti (the Goddess) as the source of strength for the male gods and the entirety of the world.

Indra consumes vast amounts of it in order to fight the serpent-dragon Vtra, who represents drought and adversity.

Known as Indra’s “seminal achievement,” it serves to define and highlight his function as the bringer of showers and rescuer of the gods in the legend of the Hindu god.

Moreover, as wielder of the thunderbolt—yes, Indra, the ancient Indian equivalent to Zeus, the head of the Greek pantheon, or Thor, the leader of the German and Viking pantheons—Indra wields both fire and water for the good of the entire world.

The Ayahuasca Religious Freedom Initiative, led by the Eagle and the Condor, needs your help.

Soma is a physically masculine deity, yet he is energetically feminine, which highlights the contrast between physical and energetic aspects of masculine and feminine characteristics: while he is a physically masculine deity, Soma is energetically feminine.

Dawn and twilight are significant times in time that transcend the dominance of day and night.

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