What Would Experience Program Director Spirituality Earn? (Solved)

How can I become a spiritual director?

  • For those who would like to learn to be spiritual directors, CHI is offering a year-long spiritual direction training program (meeting 4 times for a 5-day intensive) that provides the coursework necessary to begin one’s own private practice in spiritual direction. Like the rest of CHI ’s programs, it is interfaith in its orientation.

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How much do directors of programs make?

The national average salary for a Director of Programs is $77,581 in United States. Filter by location to see Director of Programs salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 165 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by Director of Programs employees.

Can you make a living as a spiritual director?

Yes. But it may take years to build up a spiritual direction practice to the point that you are making a middle-class income. Once you begin marketing, you may get a few inquiries but your practice will really build after people who have come to you for direction start sending their friends.

What does a spiritual director do?

The spiritual father or spiritual director may provide advice, give indications of life and prayer, resolving doubts in matters of faith and morals without replacing the choices and decisions to the person accompanying.

How much should I pay my spiritual director?

How much does spiritual direction cost? A standard offering for an hour of spiritual direction is around 50-70 USD. Many spiritual directors will make accommodations if this is cost prohibitive.

Do you pay spiritual directors?

Fees for spiritual direction typically run on a sliding scale, up to $150 per 50-minute session. Some directors offer pro bono services for those who can’t afford to pay.

What makes a good Program Director?

A successful Program Director must have a broad knowledge of program management principles. They must have a strategic mindset as well as be able to lead and develop their subordinates. The goal is to ensure every program will be delivered successfully and add the highest possible value to the organization.

What is the difference between program manager and Program Director?

In service industries, such as education, a program manager or program director researches, plans, develops and implements one or more of the firm’s professional services. In program management, the Program Director is a senior manager responsible for the overall success of the program.

How much do residency program directors make?

While ZipRecruiter is seeing annual salaries as high as $189,500 and as low as $13,500, the majority of Residency Program Director salaries currently range between $39,500 (25th percentile) to $75,000 (75th percentile) with top earners (90th percentile) making $133,000 annually across the United States.

Do you need a degree to be a spiritual director?

The required education is defined as formal classroom education in the spiritual direction field. An applicant applying for certification must have a master’s degree from a recognized accredited institution with a focus in biblical, theological studies and a minimum of six courses in spirituality.

Should I get a spiritual director?

If you want to grow in your faith journey and spiritual life, you might consider getting a spiritual director. Spiritual directors are dedicated to guiding people in the spiritual journey, and helping them explore matters of the soul, faith, and God. Spiritual direction is a practice found in many faith traditions.

What does it take to be a spiritual director?

Prospective Certified Spiritual Directors must: Have an acceptable graduate degree in the area of theology, biblical studies, and spirituality. Done the required Spiritual Formation courses. Completed 500 hours of Spiritual Direction practicum.

Spiritual Direction Certificate

With a transforming experience, the Spiritual Direction Certificate Program at Divine Mercy educates students to be spiritual directors with the heart and mind of Jesus Christ and in the tradition of the Church’s tried and tested experience. The Spiritual Direction Certificate (SDC) Program is designed to give prospective spiritual directors with the information, skills, and supervision they need to be successful. The program attempts to address the continual need for followers of Jesus Christ to support one another as they strive to become more loyal disciples of the Lord on a day-to-day basis through various activities.

Classes are provided three times a year in eight-week parts, with each session lasting eight weeks.

Graduates of the Spiritual Direction Certificate Program will be able to:

  • Belief in your spiritual director persona while also demonstrating the necessary core knowledge and abilities. Enter the life of the directee with compassion and respect
  • And Develop ways to spiritual guidance that are oriented on Christ and on the individual
  • To promote deep spiritual flourishing, basic social and behavioral skills, as well as a habit of sound theological reasoning, should be employed. Demonstrate a vision of the flourishing person that encourages them, as spiritual directors, and the people they direct to have the courage to believe in, hope for, and love

Spiritual Direction Questions

The following is an excerpt from an article titled ” Noticing the Duck: The Art of Asking Spiritual Questions ” written by Portland Seminary dean MaryKate Morse and published on the Portland Seminary website. If you find these snippets useful, be sure to read the entire article to benefit from the associated examples, context, deeper depth, and the background behind the article’s title and subtitle.

Beginnings: Getting-to-Know-You Questions

People are typically able to answer the first few questions they are asked. They do not cause people to be nervous or confused. These questions serve as a beginning point for the spiritual director in getting to know the person and his or her faith better. Questions at the start of a conversation are not leading questions. When someone is looking for a certain answer, they will ask leading questions. These, on the other hand, are questions for which there are no correct solutions. A person is free to respond in any way they want without having to worry about being judged by others.

  • Who was the first person to make a memory of God for you
  • Who was the first person to build a memory of God for you
  • Which of the following is your earliest memory of God? Where do you find your spiritual hero or role model? In your life, what is a narrative that encapsulates the core of who you are
  • What is a narrative that embodies your current requirement
  • Describe the image that comes to mind when you think about God.

Ready to Go: General Current Spiritual Reality

General queries that explore understanding about the spiritual directee’s current spiritual reality are a great method to move forward in the relationship. Ignatian spirituality, for example, uses inquiries to investigate the present motions within a person that are either toward God, referred to as consolations, or away from God, referred to as desolations. The following questions, when asked by persons who are not schooled in Ignatian spirituality, achieve, in general, the same results as if they had received such training.

The spiritual directee can offer whatever amount of passion and involvement he or she wishes since these are open questions.

  • What is it that you want from God? I’m wondering what God’s desire is for you. What are the impediments to success

Going Deeper: Specific Current Spiritual Reality

As soon as a person feels comfortable sharing with a spiritual director or mentor, the person can be invited to share more about how they usually experience God, what their specific feelings are right now, and what they have done to nurture a relationship with God with the spiritual director or mentor.

When a spiritual mentor reaches this stage in the relationship, he or she begins to investigate the spiritual house, becoming acquainted with its habits, traps, graces, and problems.

  • Please tell the tale of your spiritual development from childhood to the present day. Include information about your family’s background as well as your own growing-up experiences. What has been going on in your prayer life recently
  • When it comes to your connection with God, what are your prevailing feelings? What kinds of internal motions (calls, inclinations, intuitions, initiatives) are you experiencing? What obstacles or temptations are you facing at this time in your spiritual life? When it comes to maintaining your connection with God, what are your patterns or habits? In your spiritual path, who are your closest connections and relationships, and how do they help you to stay on track? When it comes to your career or ministry, how are you growing and developing spiritually? What methods do you use to determine the presence of God in your life

Going Still Deeper: Unpacking Questions

Following the establishment of more trust, a spiritual director or mentor might begin to gently bring a spiritual directee into places of his or her own mind that he or she might otherwise avoid. The places where a person feels unfree and internally bound are those in which they feel unfree and internally bound. The spots where she or he is puzzled, humiliated, or afraid are the ones identified as such. Individuals will sometimes recount a narrative that has a deep importance for them, but they will not be able to explain why.

They are perplexed by the presence of God in the narrative.

Not the “why,” which is concerned with determining the explanations for events that have occurred or for the actions of individuals.

Inquiring “why” can provide valuable insights into what is really distressing about a certain situation.

Question-Asking Etiquette

So, what is the proper etiquette for asking questions during a spiritual direction session? Etiquette is a notion that is not widely accepted. Etiquette is frequently seen as a set of rules and prescribed behaviors that hinder genuine, honest relationships between people in most of Western culture. Nonetheless, proper dining etiquette entails much more than simply following suggested guidelines for how to behave during meals or in social situations. In spiritual guidance, etiquette is simply the manner in which one shows respect for another by treating them with decency and consideration.

  • Ask inquiries that are focused on the individual, rather than your own impressions of them. It is not about you at all. It is best not to provide long anecdotes about yourself or to give extensive explanations about your beliefs, experiences, or religion. Hold off on responding or asking any questions until you have thoroughly heard
  • Keep the questions open, rather than closing them. Closed questions are those that can only be answered with a yes or no answer or that lead the spiritual directee to a specific conclusion. Open inquiries provide opportunity for the spiritual directee to be completely honest about whatever is going on within her or him. Instead of maintaining a connection with you, keep the spiritual directee’s connection with his or her spiritual journey strong. Maintain a neutral, grace-filled, and inviting demeanor throughout the conversation. Some persons suffering from attachment disorders or victim issues will attempt to remain linked to and dependent on you rather than concentrating on their spiritual development. Occasionally, they will ask you questions in order to feed your ego and position you as the “rescuer.” Always get permission before venturing further. “Do you mind if I delve a bit farther into this? Would you mind answering a follow-up question? I’d want to push back a little bit on it.” There is no way to force someone to answer any of these sorts of inquiries. A person who expresses an unwillingness to discuss something with me is not included in this discussion. I once had to wait a whole year before a spiritual directee brought up a very tough issue that had occurred previously. When she raised it up, she was prepared to put it into the open
  • This is not a sprint, but rather a walk. Maintain a consistent pace and match the person’s emotional condition and physical capacity. If the person is depressed, exhausted, or anxious, attempting to compel her or him to share more information will not be beneficial. Allow yourself to be fully present to what he or she is able to deliver
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Spiritual and Religious Life

It is the mission of the Center for Spiritual and Religious Life to encourage and promote the exploration and expression of spirituality, religious life, faith-traditions, values, and philosophies of life in the context of higher education. With the Spiritual and Religious Life program, the goal is for interested students to have access to activities and programs that will allow them to pursue their full spiritual growth and development, as well as to create a campus environment in which interested members of the campus community can freely express their religion, spirituality, and faith without fear of reprisal.

The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the greater Milwaukee area provide involvement opportunities for people of all faiths and philosophical backgrounds.

Spiritual and religious communities at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (campus religious centers) To offer your contact information to one or more spiritual and religious communities, you can do so by visiting one of the following websites: Form for students expressing an interest

Program Goals

  • More possibilities for kids to connect with their “inner selves” should be made available to them. This will aid in the development of their academic and leadership abilities, as well as the improvement of their psychological well-being and contentment with college (derived from “Attending to Students’ Inner Lives: A Call to Higher Education, April 2011).
  • Students’ spiritual growth will be emphasized via involvement and participation in high-impact activities such as interfaith discussion, philanthropic action, and reflection/meditation exercises. Contribute to the Essential Learning Outcomes (LEAP) in the areas of understanding of human cultures, the physical and natural world, intercultural knowledge and competency, ethical thinking and action, and engagement with major problems, both contemporary and timeless. In order to achieve their objectives, religious or spiritual activities or services should give chances for students to:
  • Develop a personal philosophy of life and express it verbally
  • Acquire the abilities and knowledge necessary to deal with issues of values, ethics, and morality. In this paper, we will look at the interaction of faith, intellectual inquiry, and social responsibility as a basis for discovering and affirming meaning and satisfaction in life. Taking part in and facilitating interaction between and among representatives of religious and/or spiritual organizations and the secular sector Participate in the expression of one’s faith(s) alongside other people

Research

In 2004, Alexander W. Astin, Helen S. Astin, and Jennifer A. Lindholm conducted foundational research on the spiritual quest of students in higher education, which was published in the Journal of Higher Education. The study “The Spiritual Life of College Students: A National Study of College Students’ Search for Meaning and Purpose” was published by the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA and served as the basis for the book “Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students’ Inner Lives,” which was published by the University of California Press (Astin, AstinLindhom, 2011).

The findings of the study identified five spiritual characteristics:

  • The degree to which the student is actively attempting to become a more self-aware and enlightened person, as well as to find solutions to life’s puzzles and “great questions,” is reflected in the Spiritual Quest category. It evaluates the amount to which a student is able to find meaning in difficult circumstances, feels at peace, sees each day as a gift, and is satisfied with the direction her life is taking. It displays the student’s devotion to ideals such as assisting people in need, alleviating pain and suffering around the globe, as well as encouraging racial understanding. Participating in community work, providing money to a charitable organization, and assisting friends with personal issues are examples of actions that fall under this category. Having an Ecumenical Worldview indicates the extent to which the student is interested in different religious traditions and seeks to understand other countries and cultures. It also indicates the extent to which the student feels a strong connection to all humanity and believes that all life is interconnected.

The degree to which a student is actively seeking to become a more self-aware and enlightened person, as well as to find answers to life’s mysteries and “big questions,” is reflected in the Spiritual Quest category. It measures the extent to which a student is able to find meaning in difficult circumstances, feels at peace, views each day as a gift, and is satisfied with the direction her life is taking. It reflects the student’s commitment to values such as assisting others in need, alleviating pain and suffering throughout the world, as well as promoting racial understanding; Participating in community work, providing money to a charitable organization, and assisting friends with personal troubles are examples of charitable involvement.

  • The degree to which the student is actively striving to become a more self-aware and enlightened person, as well as to discover solutions to life’s puzzles and “great questions,” is reflected in the Spiritual Quest. Equanimity evaluates the amount to which a student is able to find meaning in difficult circumstances, feels at ease, views each day as a gift, and is satisfied with the path her life is taking. This value indicates the student’s dedication to principles such as assisting people in need, decreasing pain and suffering in the world, and encouraging racial understanding. Participating in community work, contributing money to charity, and assisting friends with personal troubles are all examples of charitable involvement. The degree to which a student is interested in diverse religious traditions, aspires to understand other nations and cultures, has a strong connection to all people, and thinks that all life is interrelated is indicated by their Ecumenical Worldview.

Remarks from the research summary section of “Attendance to Students’ Inner Lives: A Call to Higher Education,” published in April 2011.

Religious & Spiritual Life

Baptist Collegiate Ministries Jay Sanders, Director We are a community with a purpose. A place where college students come together to ask questions, explore who Jesus Christ is and search for something bigger than themselves.something that’s beyond their busy worlds of homework, stress, work and ideas of success. From our weekly worship experience, to intramurals, to trips that take you halfway around the world, we are a passionate community that journeys through life together. [email protected]:www.usfbcm.com Thursdays at 8pm
Bhakti Yoga Society Randy Meier (Ramiya) and Pam Meier (Ananta) Seeking a full spiritual experience?We teachpractice yoga, mantra meditation Hare Krishna Kirtan – musical group mantra meditation. Explore the depth of pure ancient science from Bhagavad Gita of your identity as pure spiritual being.Enjoy vegetarian food and learn how to prepare it.We meet in a group weekly in Marshall Student Center to learn and experience these most powerful spiritual practices and why they work so powerfully. [email protected]
Catholic Student Center Fr. Kyle Bell,Director The USF Catholic Student Union is a home for you to discover or continue in your Catholic faith. We welcome you to journey with our community of disciples as we grow in our life-long friendship with Jesus Christ. Please join us for weekend and daily Masses, community prayer, on-campus Bible studies, Catholic Bulls Nights, Men’sWomen’s Group, and much more! We also have faith-based housing – Bellarmine Newman Hall – right across from campus. [email protected]:www.catholicusf.org Weekend and daily Masses,
Chabad on Campus Jewish Student Center Rabbi Pinny Backman, Executive DirectorMrs. Chava Backman, Director Chabad at USF serves as a home away from home for the students at USF. We provide a home where every student feels comfortable regardless of their Jewish affiliation. Some highlights at Chabad are our famous Birthright trips to Israel, Free Friday Night Home-made Shabbat dinners, Holiday programs and events, Sinai Scholars Society, Greek Programs and much more! [email protected]
Cru JohnSchneider,Campus Director Cru is a worldwide Christian campus ministry. At USF our movement consists of a community where students can connect to one another and Jesus, grow in these relationships, and be a part of impacting USF and the world beyond with God’s love. There are many ways to experience life with Cru including Cru Connect weekly meeting, discipleship groups, worship, parties, intramurals, retreats, mission trips, etc. We’d love to have you join us! [email protected]@cru.org Wednesday 7:30pm
St. Anselm’s Episcopal Chapel Center Rev. Scott Nonken, Chaplain Empowered by the love of Jesus Christ for ALL, St. Anselm’s Episcopal Chapel Center welcomes YOU! Whoever you are, and wherever on your journey, you’re invited to join us for weekly worship in the Episcopal-Anglican tradition, Christian Education and community fellowship with meals. Meet us in the chapel on Thursdays at 6:30pm. Sunday evening services offered the first Sunday of every month at 5:00pm —visit our website for updates. We are committed to nurturing the spiritual formation and wholeness of individuals through the proclaimed and embodied Gospel. Our chaplain is available for pastoral care support by appointment. [email protected] Meet us in the chapel on Thursdays at 6:30pm. Sunday evening services offered the first Sunday of every month at 5:00pm
Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship Pastors Steven and Kasey Widner Chi Alpha is a campus ministry that exists to be a place of belonging for USF students, and a place to safely explore your beliefs. We want to be with you every step of the way, and be a home away from home! [email protected](612) 382-4172 Tuesday night in the MSC 2709
Cornerstone Student Fellowship Pete Saucedo,Advisor We are a student organization whose purpose is to provide an opportunity for Christ- centered fellowship. Events include parties, sports days and community service. You can reach us at Bulls Connect for more information.
Hillel Jewish Student Center Rabbi Ed Rosenthal, Executive Director/ Campus RabbiLinda Wolf, Assistant DirectorSylvie Feinsmith, Program DirectorBrady Goldstein, Engagement Associate Hillel Jewish Student Center is the gateway for Jewish life at USF whose mission is to provide for the social, spiritual, political and educational needs of our students through community service projects, Israel activism, Shabbat and holiday celebrations, leadership opportunities and lots of fun. Fridays at 6:30pm
InterVarsity Christian Fellowship Erica Cannon InterVarsity is a Jesus Centered movement of missional community seeking to give every USF student and faculty a space to respond to Jesus. [email protected] Thursday 7:30 pm
The Navigators @USF AndrewSarah Duran, Campus Directors The Navigators are a non-denominational community of students who are seeking to grow in their relationship with God and impact the world around them. [email protected] Wednesdays at 9pm
Reformed University Fellowship Aldo Mondin, Campus Minister RUF is a gospel-centered student organization connecting students to Jesus Christ and to one another, while seeking to serve our campus, the community and the world. [email protected] Tuesdays at 7:00pm
The Harbor at USF Pastor: Chris StephenCoordinator: Lara McCay The Harbor at USF exists for students to encounter, be equipped and be empowered by Jesus to engage students for Jesus. We develop this by gathering together on Tuesday nights for our main gathering as well as smaller community groups throughout the week. [email protected] Hours of operation: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday (1pm-5pm)Worship Gathering: Tuesday: (8pm-10pm)
Young Life College at USF Alissa Holcomb, Director Whether looking for faith or just a place to have fun and laugh, YL College is for every one. We offer community through YL Club and small groups, camp trips and leadership opportunities on campus or at surrounding area middle and high schools. We provide a place of acceptance and friendships for all students. [email protected]

Clinician Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC)

We think that spiritual care, as a component of whole person care, is a fundamental human right. In order to do this, ISPEC is a unique and effective method of bringing spiritual care training to health-care institutions all over the world. The founder and medical director of GWish, Christina Puchalski M.D. FACP, FAAHPM

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ISPEC ©: Spiritual Care Training for Doctors, Nurses, Chaplains, Social Workers, Psychologists—All Types of Practitioners

International Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC) is an evidence-based curriculum that teaches all types of health care providers how to address their patients’ spiritual needs in the course of their daily health care practice. In conjunction with an area chaplain or spiritual director, ISPEC is a combination of more than two decades of research, education, and clinical best practices that has been compiled into a single course. ISPEC, which was established in 2018, has already began the process of producing leaders, mentors, and repeatable models of spiritual care training in a variety of nations.

We would like to express our gratitude to Dr.

We would also like to express our gratitude to the Fetzer Institute for their assistance and support throughout the first stages of the creation of the ISPEC program.

This copyright is courtesy of GWish and The George Washington University, updated in 2021. All intellectual property rights are retained.

Spiritual Care Training: ISPEC ©Online Self-Study Course

You may join the rising number of health care professionals who are devoted to alleviating spiritual and existential suffering among patients and their families from the comfort of their own institution, workplace, or home by working from your own location. As a member of this online community, you will gain knowledge about:

  • You may join the rising number of health care professionals who are devoted to alleviating spiritual and existential suffering in patients and their families from the comfort of their own institution, office, or home. In this online community, you will gain knowledge in the following areas:

Those who engage in this course will be able to more compassionately meet the spiritual needs of their patients, whether they are physicians, nurses, social workers, homecare providers, or any other sort of health-care professional. DISCOVER MORE ABOUT THE ISPEC ONLINE SELF-STUDY COURSE HERE.

Interprofessional Spiritual Care Education Curriculum (ISPEC ©)

The ISPEC training course, which is offered regionally, nationally, and internationally, provides a unique opportunity for clinicians and chaplain teams to learn how to encourage and empower other health care professionals, fellows, and students to address patients’ spiritual needs as an integral part of providing health care. The following are included in the ISPEC:

  • Presentations, case studies, debates, and lab sessions are included in this two-day training course designed to assist in the establishment of spiritual care practices in health-care facilities
  • Unlimited one-year access to the ISPEC online course, which may be shared with other members of your organization
  • A one-year mentoring program from prominent educators to assist you in making advancement inside your firm
  • When the course is completed, the student will get continuing education credits.

In our vision for GWish, we envisage a world in which ALL patients and their families have access to spiritual care while they are experiencing a health crisis. ISPEC is your opportunity to become a part of the movement that is paving the path for more compassionate health-care systems for all people. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE ISPEC TRAINING COURSE We strongly encourage that you participate in the program with a local chaplain or spiritual director in order to effectively integrate your ISPEC experience into your own company.

Spiritual Care Training:ISPEC ©Offered at Institutions

In our vision for GWish, we envisage a world in which ALL patients and their families have access to spiritual care while they are experiencing a medical emergency. You have the chance to become a part of the movement that is paving the way for more humane health care systems for all. THE ISPEC TRAINING COURSE: FIND OUT MORE INFORMATION We strongly encourage that you enroll in the program with a local chaplain or spiritual director in order to effectively integrate your ISPEC experience into your own company.

Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats (Graduate Certificate)

” href=” CampusCreighton University’s Graduate Certificate in Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats provides an opportunity for meditation, prayer, worship, and study, all of which contribute to the development of a thorough understanding of Christian Spirituality. ” href=” Campus This program will give you with hands-on Ignatian spiritual direction training to help you improve your abilities to minister to people in a more effective way. As part of your formation, you will develop an apostolic spirituality, which will result in a profound spiritual and moral renewal that will enable you to react correctly to the many important crises facing mankind in the twenty-first century.

Apply what you learn to your life—or ministering others

This program will provide you with opportunity to self-reflect, obtain a more in-depth grasp of Christian Spirituality, and put your ministerial abilities to the test. By developing discernment abilities, you will be encouraged to integrate the information you have learned and apply it to your own life situation.

As part of the training, you will be asked to interpret course materials in order to develop your own meditative, evocative approach to spiritual guidance.

Dedicate some time to self-reflection and prayer

It is hoped that this program would provide you with chances to self-reflect, get a better grasp of Christian Spirituality, and put your ministerial talents to the test. By developing discernment abilities, you will be encouraged to internalize the information you have learned and apply it to your own life. As part of the training, you will be asked to interpret course materials in order to develop your own thoughtful and expressive approach to spiritual guidance.

Program Details

It is recommended for anybody over the age of 30 who intends to pursue a career as a professional Spiritual or Retreat Director to pursue the Graduate Certificate in Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats. Students can apply what they learn in class to their ministry and personal lives. To be eligible for this certificate, you must complete the following 18 credits:

  • If you are above the age of 30 and want to pursue a career as a professional Spiritual Director or Retreat Director, the Graduate Certificate in Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats is the program for you. In ministry and in everyday life, students may put what they have learned to use. Complete the following 18 credits to earn this certificate:

Faculty

The Theology Department at Creighton University is home to a number of researchers and professors who have received national and worldwide recognition for their contributions to the fields of teaching and research. Graduate Certificate in Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats draws on the expertise of this group of teachers to train spiritual directors in the Jesuit tradition. Continue reading for more information. Display Less—

Additional CertificateMaster’s Degree Options

Certificate in the Ignatian Tradition (Graduate Certificate) (9 credits)

  • Certificate in the Ignatian Tradition for Graduate Students (9 credits)

MASTER’S DEGREE

Graduate Diploma in the Ignatian Tradition (9 credits)

  • Graduate Certificate in the Ignatian Tradition (9 credits)

Continue reading for more information. Display Less—

Admission Requirements

Applicants for the Graduate Certificate in Spiritual Direction and Directed Retreats program must meet the following requirements in order to be considered:

  • Submit a completed application along with an up-to-date curriculum vitae or resume Please include an authentic transcript from the school that awarded the Bachelor’s degree in order to complete the application. More information about sending transcripts may be found here.
  • Send in a personal statement expressing your interest in the graduate certificate program. Have completed 12 recent credits in undergraduate or graduate theology, as well as two years of regular spiritual direction. Currently, you are getting frequent spiritual guidance and you are committed to the program’s spiritual aims. You must submit three letters of recommendation from somebody other than friends or family members who can attest to your lifelong commitment to religion and prayer. You must be at least 30 years old
  • Attend at least one quiet, guided retreat of at least eight days before commencing lessons

It may be necessary to seek a personal interview in addition to the following prerequisites. The interview might take place in person or by video conference. Due to the fact that F-1 visas will not be given, international students are allowed to enroll in this program as long as they complete it in their country of residence. Continue reading for more information. Display Less—

TuitionFinancial Aid

In addition to the requirements listed above, a personal interview may be requested by the employer. The interview might take place in person or by video conference. Due to the fact that F-1 visas will not be given, international students are welcome to participate in this program as long as they complete it in their country of residence. + Less is more in this case.

Dates and Deadlines

In addition to the foregoing qualifications, a personal interview may be asked. The interview might take place in person or over the phone. F-1 visas will not be given for international students enrolled in this program as long as they finish it in their country of residence. More information may be found here. Display Less —

ON-CAMPUS

Contact a Graduate Enrollment Specialist for assistance.

Let’s Take the Next Steps Together

The Program for the Evolution of Spirituality (PES) promotes the scientific investigation of new spiritual movements, marginalized spiritualities, and the cutting-edge edges of established religious traditions in the United States. It also prepares students to serve as ministers in these organizations. The program, which includes conferences, field trips, course offerings, and public talks, advances HDS’s knowledge and competence in areas such as spirituality among the millennial generation, ecological spirituality, and the ethics of power in spiritual communities, among other things.

Professor Dan McKanan is in charge of the program’s direction.

Inaugural Ecological Spiritualities Conference

Many people have expressed a desire to continue the conversation following our virtual panel on “Abuse of Power in Alternative and Emerging Spiritual and Cultural Organizations,” which took place on February 25. As a result, we are launching a permanent discussion on our platform about this complicated and sensitive subject matter. It is our intention to hold monthly colloquia that will bring together a diverse range of speakers from a variety of backgrounds, including practitioners, scholars, survivors, and activists, who will come together to discuss their experiences with power dynamics, both positive as well as negative, in emerging and alternative spiritual and cultural organizations.

View previous PES events that have taken place.

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Associated Courses and Groups

‘Religion and ecology’ is one of the fastest-growing subfields within the study of religion, and we will take a broadly “ecological” approach to this topic, meaning that we will look for connections between seemingly disparate phenomena, as well as the ways in which all phenomena are constantly changing and evolving in mutual relationship. A specific emphasis will be placed on current discussions about sustainable agriculture and ethical eating in this course, which will examine the nexus of religious traditions and environmental action.

Course: HDS 3099: Earth-Based Spiritualities: An Anthropological Perspective Instructor: Giovanna Parmigiani

Course on the Anthropology of Religion, with a specific emphasis on modern earth-based spiritualities such as Contemporary Paganism, Wicca, NewAge, and Core-Shamanism, as well as other related topics. Despite the fact that these faiths are sometimes misrepresented in popular culture, they are now a part of the life of an increasing number of individuals and groups. Students will get familiar with or expand their understanding of the major topics, traditions, debates, and research in the area of Anthropology of Religion via engagement with ethnographic works, which will be predominantly based on the United States and Europe.

International Communal Studies Association: 2022 Conference Call for Papers

“Co-Creating Community: Evolving Models of Intentional Community” is the title of this paper. At the fourteenth annual conference of the International Communal Studies Association (ICSA), participants will learn about the ways communes and intentional communities are constantly changing in their relationships to one another as well as to the larger culture and to political and environmental challenges. Call for Papers for the ICSA Conference (PDF)

Student Animism Reading Group

As part of its study of indigenous cosmologies and Western animist worldviews, the Animism Reading Group has monthly discussions on the subject. It is an open group that welcomes anybody who is interested in participating in this discussion, including students, staff, and members of the local community. We meet twice a week to explore recent work on animist cosmologies, as well as the consequences of these theories for politics, ethics, culture, and scientific inquiry. However, while the major goal of the club is to further academic knowledge, it also serves to give affirmation and a sense of community for people whose spiritual beliefs incorporate an animist conception of the universe.

CSWR research fellowship recipient Mary Balkon founded the group, which is currently facilitated by Natalia Schwien, MTS 2021, who is also a CSWR researcher.

Staff

Dan McKanan is the Program Director for this project. Senior Lecturer in Divinity at the Ralph Waldo Emerson Unitarian Universalist Association in New York City. Natalia Schwien, Assistant Program Director HDS MTS Candidate, Class of 2021 Natalia Schwien

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Contact

The Program for the Evolution of Spirituality Harvard Divinity School Divinity Hall, Room 409 Cambridge, MA 02138 [email protected] The Program for the Evolution of Spirituality Harvard Divinity School Divinity Hall, Room 409 Cambridge, MA 02138 Contact Michael Naughton in the HDS Office of Communications with any questions or requests pertaining to the media.

Seven Ways to Improve Your Spiritual Health

The Program for the Evolution of Spirituality Harvard Divinity School Divinity Hall, Room 409 Cambridge, MA 02138 [email protected] The Program for the Evolution of Spirituality Harvard Divinity School Divinity Hall, Room 409 Cambridge, MA 02138 Michael Naughton in the HDS Office of Communications should be contacted with any media queries or requests.

What Is Spiritual Bypassing?

Spiritual bypassing is a term used to describe the tendency to use spiritual explanations to avoid dealing with difficult psychological issues. The term was coined in the early 1980s by a transpersonal psychotherapist named John Welwood in his book Toward a Psychology of Awakening, which was published in 1984 and is still in print today. Using spiritual ideas and practices to avoid confronting unresolved emotional issues, psychological wounds, or unfinished developmental tasks, according to Welwood, can be defined as a “tendency to use spiritual ideas and practices to sidestep or avoid confronting unresolved emotional issues, psychological wounds, or unfinished developmental tasks.” As a therapist and Buddhist instructor, Welwood began to see that individuals (including himself) frequently used spirituality as a shield or as a form of defensive mechanism against difficult situations.

Rather than dealing with difficult emotions or addressing unsolved difficulties, individuals would simply disregard them as a result of their religious beliefs.

As a result, it merely glosses over the issue, allowing it to fester without providing a lasting solution.

Signs

Spiritual bypassing is a method of concealing one’s identity behind spirituality or religious activities. Because it hinders individuals from realizing what they are feeling, they become estranged from themselves and from other people. The following are some examples of spiritual bypassing:

  • It is possible to conceal oneself behind spirituality or spiritual practices through spiritual bypassing. It prevents people from acknowledging their feelings and causes them to feel disconnected from themselves and others. The following are some examples of spiritual bypassing.

It is a superficial method of avoiding difficulties in a way that may make us feel better in the short term but which ultimately accomplishes nothing and only causes the problem to persist in its current state of existence.

Examples

Spiritual bypassing might be difficult to detect at times since it is frequently quite subtle in its effects. However, considering the following instances might assist in making this phenomena more apparent:

  • Often, after the loss of a loved one, people reassure the remaining family that the departed is “in a better place” and that everything happened “according to God’s plan.”
  • A lady feels enraged and unhappy over anything that has been done to her by someone else. When she attempts to express her thoughts, her friends warn her to quit being so negative
  • Nonetheless, she continues. A relative often breaches boundaries and behaves in ways that are detrimental to the other members of the family. The victims of such behavior believe that they must suppress their emotions and maintain an excessive level of tolerance rather than confronting the perpetrators.

It is very common for persons who are coping with troubles to employ spiritual bypassing to reject the very genuine concerns that they have. When dealing with apparent abuse, those who are subjected to prejudice are frequently told to merely be “polite,” “civil,” or “patient.” It indicates that individuals may rely on their own positive thinking to help them solve difficult social problems.

Recognizing Spiritual Bypassing

In the event that you say the following things, you may be engaging in spiritual bypassing:

  • Everyone believes that “Everything occurs for a purpose.” Others believe that “You create your own happiness.”
  • “It was for the best.”
  • “It was a blessing in disguise.”
  • “Only good vibes!”
  • “Thoughts and prayers!”

Before turning to clichés, consider who the statement is truly intended to benefit from them. What is truly comforting or insightful about what you’re saying, or is it just a method of ignoring a terrible circumstance so that you can feel better about yourself?

Causes

Spiritual bypassing is used as a type of protective strategy in some cases. The fact that it shelters us from problems that appear too difficult to cope with has a price. Ignoring or avoiding the issue can make stress worse in the long run and make it more difficult to resolve the problem in the future. While avoidance is the primary motivator for this type of behavior, there are a variety of other factors that contribute to its development. The wellness culture, which frequently promotes ideals of poisonous positivity and constant happiness, is occasionally cited as a motivating factor in spiritual bypassing practices.

It’s a problem in that negative emotions are normal and are frequently a sign that something needs to be done to improve the situation.

An individualistic culture that promotes the idea that in order to achieve true happiness, people must strive for self-actualization also contributes to a tendency to avoid difficult or painful emotions, such as anger or sadness.

Impacts

Bypassing the spiritual realm isn’t necessarily a negative thing. In times of extreme discomfort, it might be a useful tool for momentarily alleviating feelings of frustration or worry. Researchers, on the other hand, believe that when utilized as a long-term method to suppress difficulties, it can have negative consequences. The practice of spiritual bypassing can have a variety of negative consequences. It can have an impact on one’s own well-being as well as one’s relationships with others.

  • Anxiety
  • Blind loyalty to political leaders
  • Codependency, control issues, a lack of concern for personal responsibility, emotional disorientation, and an excessive tolerance for improper or inappropriate behavior are all symptoms of codependency. Shame and embarrassment
  • Narcissism on a spiritual level

Spiritual narcissism is the practice of utilizing spiritual rituals as a means of increasing one’s sense of self-importance.

It frequently entails the use of spirituality to lift the individual up while also utilizing it as a weapon to bring others crashing down.

Denying Difficult Emotions

Religious activities are used to enhance one’s sense of self-importance, which is known as spiritual narcisism. Most of the time, it entails the use of spirituality to elevate oneself while simultaneously using it to bring others down.

Dismissing Other People’s Emotions

Spiritual narcissism is the practice of utilizing spiritual rituals as a means of enhancing one’s sense of self-importance. It frequently entails utilizing spirituality to lift oneself up while also using it as a weapon to bring others down.

Avoiding Responsibility

Spiritual narcissism is defined as the use of spiritual rituals as a means of increasing one’s sense of self-importance. It frequently entails the use of spirituality to lift the individual up while also using it as a weapon to bring others down.

Judging Others

The act of throwing judgment on others for expressing legitimate anger is a sort of spiritual bypassing. Anger is a natural emotion, and it is a totally fair response to a wide range of events and circumstances. It indicates that something is amiss and that action is required to correct the issue or repair the connection. Valid emotions are not suppressed by authentic spirituality just because they are uncomfortable for the practitioner. It’s quite normal to experience tough emotions such as rage, envy, and frustration.

Justifying Suffering

The act of passing judgment on others for expressing justified anger is a form of spiritual bypassing. In many situations and occurrences, it is absolutely fair to feel angry and react in a sensible manner. It indicates that there is a problem and that action is required to correct the situation or repair a broken relationship. Valid emotions are not suppressed by authentic spirituality just because they are uncomfortable to experience. Even difficult emotions such as anger, jealousy and disappointment are acceptable.

How It Hampers Growth

While spiritual bypassing may be less detrimental than some other coping techniques, it can nevertheless result in negative consequences that impair an individual’s capacity to develop as a person and reach their full potential as a result of their actions. It has the potential to suffocate emotional development and even get in the way of fully developed spiritual development. The practice of spiritual bypassing can also include engaging in “spiritual” activities in order to feel better about oneself or to avoid having to take any significant action.

Instead of becoming involved in your community, you’ll go to a temple to meditate.

The problem is not with partaking in these spiritual activities in the first place.

This is why spiritual bypassing may be so subtle and difficult to detect, both in yourself and in others, under certain situations.

It is possible to strengthen your sense of belonging by visiting noteworthy locations in your community.

What makes the difference is the motivations that drive such acts.

Then they are most likely serving mostly as a spiritual bypass, preventing actual progress from occurring. Bypassing spiritual expressions that are beneficial to your progress as a person, on the other hand, builds a barrier between you and real growth.

Tips and Tricks

Spiritual bypassing may serve as a means of protecting oneself from things that one perceives as threatening, but it does so at the expense of a vital reality. We are unable to pick and choose the emotions we will encounter. It is impossible to live only on the basis of positive ideas, sentiments, and emotions. The highs must be balanced by the lows in order for us to fully appreciate them. The following are some suggestions for how you might try to deal with a tendency to spiritual bypass:

  • It is best not to categorize feelings as good or negative. Despite the fact that certain emotions are negative or unpleasant, they have a function. Emotional experiences are not wrong or taboo, and feeling these emotions does not imply that you are a poor or untrustworthy person. Try to accept your emotions and remember that all emotional states are only temporary
  • Also remember that negative thoughts and feelings have a purpose and should be acknowledged. It is not the goal of life to avoid having such thoughts
  • Rather, it is to channel those thoughts into positive actions. Remember that uncomfortable feelings are often a sign that something is wrong and that something needs to be changed
  • Simply putting on rose-colored sunglasses and ignoring a problem will not solve it. If you are always attempting to alleviate discomfort by merely ignoring it, the situations that are giving you misery will continue to exist in their current form. Instead of seeing these unpleasant emotions as a burden to be avoided, consider them as an opportunity for transformation.

While spiritual bypassing makes it difficult to identify legitimate sentiments, it is crucial to remember that spirituality can be a good factor in one’s life if one chooses to accept it. According to research, spirituality may frequently have a variety of positive effects on one’s physical and mental health. Individuals frequently turn to spirituality in order to restore hope, deal with hardship, find support, and find purpose in their lives. People who engage in spiritual activities, for example, have been proven to be less likely to suffer from depression, to manage better with stress, to have better overall health, and to have higher psychological well-being.

A Word From Verywell

Avoid being too harsh on yourself when you make errors. The process of growth is a slow one, and it’s easy to slide back into old patterns, especially when dealing with something challenging. Spirit may be a good factor in your life, and many spiritual disciplines can be effective stress-management techniques when used properly. It is possible to cultivate a spiritual practice that will assist you in living a more peaceful and fulfilled life by consciously avoiding spiritual bypassing.

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