When Writing A Treatment Plan, Is It Good To Include All Things Related To Spirituality? (Correct answer)

How to write a treatment plan for mental health?

  • 1 Defining the problem or ailment 2 Describing the treatment prescribed by the health/ mental health professional 3 Setting a timeline for treatment progress (whether it’s a vague timeline or includes specific milestones) 4 Identifying the major treatment goals 5 Noting important milestones and objectives

Contents

Is spirituality an important aspect of counseling?

Spirituality and religion are critical sources of strength for many clients, are the bedrock for finding meaning in life, and can be instrumental in promoting healing and well-being. Counselors can make use of the spiritual and religious beliefs of their clients to help them explore and resolve their problems.

How do you incorporate spirituality in counseling?

Spirituality as a therapeutic strategy “Techniques include use of prayer during a session, ways to direct clients to pray, spiritual journaling, forgiveness protocols, using biblical texts to reinforce healthy mental and emotional habits and working to change punitive God images.”

How does spirituality influence patient care?

Spirituality and Patient-Centered Care In Nursing Studies show spirituality helps patients cope with stress, make crucial medical decisions, and improves their quality of life.

How does spirituality affect nursing care?

Spiritual care has positive effects on individuals’ stress responses, spiritual well-being (ie, the balance between physical, psychosocial, and spiritual aspects of self), sense of integrity and excellence, and interpersonal relationships (1). Professional nursing embraces spiritual care as a dimension of practice.

What is spirituality in therapy?

Spiritual therapy is a form of counseling that attempts to treat a person’s soul as well as mind and body by accessing individual belief systems and using that faith in a higher power to explore areas of conflict in life.

Why is spirituality so important?

It encourages people to have better relationships with themselves, others, and the unknown. Spirituality can help you deal with stress by giving you a sense of peace, purpose, and forgiveness. It often becomes more important in times of emotional stress or illness. Positive impacts of spirituality.

How do I put spirituality into practice?

Praying more, meditating more, attending gatherings of like-minded believers more often and joining a prayer or meditation group are just a few ways you can put your spirituality into practice.

What is spiritual approach?

Spirituality is the broad concept of a belief in something beyond the self. It may involve religious traditions centering on the belief in a higher power, but it can also involve a holistic belief in an individual connection to others and to the world as a whole.

Why is it important to include a spiritual assessment in your client’s care?

A spiritual assessment assists the nurse in planning holistic nursing care. Whether the nurse is unclear about the patient’s spiritual belief or the patient has a spiritual belief unfamiliar to the nurse, acronym models such as FICA provide the basis for an organized, open and non-biased assessment.

How is spirituality related to health?

Some research shows a connection between your beliefs and your sense of well being. Positive beliefs, comfort, and strength gained from religion, meditation, and prayer can contribute to well being. It may even promote healing. Improving your spiritual health may not cure an illness, but it may help you feel better.

Why is spiritual care important in the medical profession?

Study after study has shown the important link between spirituality and physical and mental health. Other studies have shown that those who take part in regular spiritual practice live longer; are better able to cope with illness, pain and stress; and have better health outcomes.

What does spiritual care mean in nursing?

Scholars have identified spiritual nursing care as essential to nursing practice and include caring for the human spirit through the development of relationships and interconnectedness between the nurse and the patient.

What is spirituality in nursing?

Within nursing definitions of spirituality have been seen to include elements such as a higher power, feelings of connectedness, purpose and meaning in life, relationships and transcendence (3-5). Spiritual care is believed to be a major part of the nurse’s role (14).

Spirituality in Therapy, Spiritual Counseling, Therapy for Spirituality

As a result, you may be considering embarking on a spiritual walkabout or drivingabout in Ireland. Alternatively, you can embark on an unexpected voyage of discovery, keeping an open mind and an open heart in quest of your thin spot, where you will be able to have a spiritual epiphany. Ardmore is a town in County Waterford, Ireland. Alternatively, you may consult with professionals. Mindie Burgoyne is a travel writer, blogger, author, tour operator, and public speaker who lives in the United Kingdom.

She tells us that there is much more to Ireland’s “piles of ancient boulders” than meets the eye.

  • What Is Spirituality
  • What Is Spiritual Wellness
  • Spirituality and Religion
  • Spirituality and Mental Health
  • Spiritual Abuse
  • Spirituality vs. Religion

What Is Spirituality?

Spirituality is often considered to be more expansive than any one religion or belief system, since it encompasses areas of cognitive and philosophic thought, as well as dimensions of emotions and conduct, among other things. Attempting to comprehend one’s own nature or the reason of one’s life may be described as spirituality by some; nevertheless, spirituality is also associated with feelings of inward awareness and satisfaction. Numerous cultures and belief systems claim that a person’s spirit is the very essence of his or her being.

While some people define themselves as spiritual without subscribing to the doctrines of any religion or even having any religious thinking, for others, religion is the embodiment of their spirituality in its most extreme form.

Spirituality may also be defined as the amount of time and attention people devote to their own and others’ well-being.

What Is Spiritual Wellness?

Spirituality and physical health are intertwined. The same way that physical wellbeing expresses bodily well-being, spiritual wellness describes the well-being of the spirit. Religious belief can have an impact on one’s spiritual well-being. Some individuals believe that being in touch with nature might help them achieve spiritual wellbeing. Others describe it in terms of their connections with other people. Others may benefit from cultivating spiritual wellbeing by leading a satisfying life in accordance with their particular ideals.

Among the possibilities are a greater power, a person’s own sense of meaning and purpose, as well as personal values and belief systems.

Because the mind and body are intertwined, when one area of health is compromised, it is possible that other areas of health will be harmed as a result.

It is possible that individuals will struggle to find purpose in their lives if they are unable to work, participate in hobbies, or do the routines of daily living on their own.

Depression and anxiety are also conditions that can be exacerbated by these sensations. People who are in excellent spiritual health can do the following:

  • Even when circumstances are challenging, have a positive and optimistic attitude
  • Have compassion and empathy for others around you
  • Have clear values and spend your life in accordance with them
  • Possess a strong feeling of one’s own value
  • Be more easily able to forgive others as well as one’s own shortcomings
  • You should be at peace or in harmony with the natural environment, your life, and the rest of the world. Meditation or religious practices such as worship and prayer might provide you with comfort.

People who are dealing with spiritual wellbeing may experience the following symptoms:

  • Feeling emptiness or as if life has no significance
  • Feeling nervous or uncomfortable on a regular basis
  • They are frequently under the impression that they must better themselves. Feeling careless or uninterested in one’s own life
  • Quick and/or harsh judgments of oneself and others are made
  • Finding it challenging to practice self-compassion and self-forgiveness
  • Lack of inner peace
  • Lack of a sense of belonging
  • Inability to express one’s feelings.

Spirituality vs. Religion

Feeling devoid of significance or as though life had no purpose. Frequently experience anxiety or uneasiness; They are always under the impression that they must improve themselves. Feeling careless or uninterested in one’s own life; feeling depressed Self- and other-judgment should be swift and/or severe. I have a terrible time with self-compassion and self-forgiveness. The inability to achieve inner serenity; the inability to feel one’s place in the world;

Spirituality and Mental Health

Feeling emptiness or as if life has no purpose; Feel worried or uncomfortable on a regular basis; They are frequently under the impression that they must better themselves; Feeling careless or uninterested in one’s life; Self- and other-judgment should be swift and/or severe; Self-compassion and self-forgiveness are tough for you; Lack of inner serenity; lack of a sense of belonging; inability to express oneself creatively.

  • Assist people in finding meaning and purpose in their lives by providing social and emotional assistance. Provide consolation to those who are grieving
  • Establish a set of ethical and moral principles by which some people choose to live

It is possible that sensitivity on the part of a therapist will be beneficial to treatment when a person who is religious or spiritual seeks treatment. This will allow the therapist to conduct a more thorough evaluation of the person seeking treatment and to consider a wider range of treatment options. Therapists who are familiar with spiritually oriented therapeutic procedures, such as spiritual journaling or forgiveness protocols, may also be able to assist persons in treatment with resources on these issues, regardless of whether they are able to address them personally.

There is a greater power in many 12-step programs, albeit this power may not be recognized explicitly.

The spiritual beliefs of persons in treatment, according to a recent study, were found to have an influence on their levels of concern, stress, and tolerability of ambiguity.

Other research has established that spiritual counseling may be beneficial for persons who are struggling with substance misuse.

Spiritual Abuse

It is possible that sensitivity on the part of a therapist will be beneficial to treatment when a person who is religious or spiritual seeks treatment. This will allow the therapist to conduct a broader evaluation of the person seeking treatment and to explore a greater variety of treatment solutions. Therapists who are familiar with spiritually oriented therapeutic procedures, such as spiritual journaling or forgiveness protocols, may also be able to provide persons in treatment with resources on these themes, regardless of whether or not they are able to address them directly themselves.

There is a greater power in many 12-step programs, but this power may not be identified explicitly.

The spiritual beliefs of patients in treatment, according to a recent study, were found to have an influence on their levels of concern, stress, and tolerability to uncertainty.

A number of other studies have found that spiritual counseling may be beneficial for those who are struggling with substance misuse.

  • Extortion of money, commodities, or services via the use of religious or spiritual beliefs
  • Making use of a person’s spirituality in order to humiliate them
  • Insulting a person’s religious beliefs and customs
  • Forcing someone to make a decision that goes against their spiritual or religious convictions
  • It is not acceptable for parents to deny children the right to choose their own religious decisions.

Therapy may be beneficial for persons who have been subjected to spiritual abuse as well as those who seek to enhance their spiritual well-being. Find out more about the role of spirituality in treatment. References:

  1. Psychotherapy may be beneficial for persons who have been subjected to spiritual abuse as well as for those who seek to enhance their spiritual wellbeing overall. Find out more about the role of spirituality in psychotherapy. References:

Integrating Spirituality and Religion into Psychotherapy Practice

Dr. Barnett has provided a free companion Power Point presentation, which may be found here: Integrating Religion and Spirituality.ppt. For some psychotherapists, it may be easy to miss or avoid discussing our clients’ spirituality and religion over the course of treatment. Some of these difficulties may not have been addressed during our training, and as a result, they may not be considered relevant to our therapeutic work with clients. After all, we are not members of the church, but rather mental health experts.

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Patients in psychotherapy, with the exception of those seeking faith-based treatment, frequently believe that psychotherapists are responsible for dealing with mental health issues and that members of the clergy are responsible for dealing with religious and spiritual concerns.

Some Definitions

Religion, according to Dew and colleagues (2008), is described as “an structured system of ideas, rituals, practices, and community that is directed toward the holy” (p. 382). Religion tends to be centered on formal organizations with ideas, rituals, and traditions that are well defined and largely accepted by the general public. As opposed to this, spirituality may be described as a “search for the holy, a process through which people attempt to find, hold on to, and in some cases, modify whatever they hold precious in their life” (HillPargament, 2008, p.

This can be a very private experience, and it is not required to be a part of religious experiences in an organized setting.

The APA Ethics Code

However, the American Psychological Association’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct (APA Ethics Code, APA, 2010) speaks directly to these concerns in its consideration of diversity and individual differences in Principle E, Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity, which addresses these concerns. “Psychologists are aware of and respect cultural, individual, and role distinctions, including those based on. religion. and take these considerations into consideration when dealing with members of such groups,” the statement reads in part (p.

Furthermore, under Standard 3.01, Unfair Discrimination, the Ethics Code specifies that psychologists “do not participate in unfair discrimination based on.

or any other ground banned by law” in their work-related activities, according to the Code (p.

How is This Relevant to Me as a Psychotherapist?

Although the American Psychological Association’s Code of Ethics and Conduct (APA Ethics Code, 2010) does not explicitly address these concerns, the discussion of diversity and individual differences in Principle E, Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity (APA, 2010) does so explicitly. This statement emphasizes that “psychologists are aware of and accept differences in cultural values, individual characteristics, and role disparities, including those based on. religion. and take these issues into consideration when dealing with members of such groups” (p.

3). The Ethics Code further specifies in Standard 3.01, Unfair Discrimination, that “psychologists must not participate in unfair discrimination based on. religion. or any other ground prohibited by law” in their work-related activities (p. 6).

  • Nine in ten Americans (92 percent) believe in the presence of God or an all-pervading spiritual force. 63% of American women and 44% of American men believe that religion is extremely important in their lives. Almost all Americans (92 percent) say they believe in God, and substantial majority (74 percent) believe in the afterlife and (63 percent) think that the Bible is God’s message. In addition to attending religious services on a regular basis (at least once or twice a month), the majority of Americans (54 percent) report that they attend worship services every week. Americans also participate in a wide range of private devotional activities, according to the survey. For example, nearly six out of ten people (58 percent) say they pray every day
  • Nearly six out of ten people (58 percent) say they believe in God. Individuals who are not associated with a specific religious tradition may not necessarily lack religious views or behaviors in and of themselves. Even among those who are not religious, a significant proportion (41 percent) believes that religion is at least somewhat important in their life, seven out of ten believe in God, and more than a quarter (27 percent) say they attend religious services at least a few times a year. (Source: Pew Research Center)

As a result, it is reasonable to presume that religion and spirituality are important in the lives of a big proportion of the clients who come into touch with a psychotherapist. However, while religious and spiritual difficulties may not be the major focus of treatment, they are likely to be important components of each client’s life, contributing to the definition of their values and beliefs, as well as their lifestyle choices and decision-making processes. As a result, according to Principle E of the American Psychological Association’s Ethics Code (APA, 2010), psychologists should be attentive to, aware of, and respectful of all individual variations, including religious and spiritual views, values, and practices, among others.

Relevance to the Practice of Psychotherapy

Consequently, it is reasonable to presume that religion and spirituality are important in the lives of a big proportion of the clients who come into touch with a psychotherapist on a daily basis. While religious and spiritual difficulties may not be the major focus of therapy, they are likely to be important components of each client’s life, contributing to the definition of their values, beliefs, lifestyle choices, and decision-making processes, and so should be addressed. Therefore, as stated in Principle E of the American Psychological Association’s Ethics Code (2010), psychologists should be attentive to, aware of, and respectful of all individual differences, including religious and spiritual views, values, and practices of all faiths or no faiths.

  1. When it comes to the underlying difficulties that cause individuals to seek treatment, religious and spiritual issues may be crucial considerations. Conflicts over religious ideals, crises of faith, feelings of alienation from one’s religion, and distortion of religious ideas and practices are only a few examples of what may go wrong with religion. As part of psychotherapy, individuals may be encouraged to draw on their religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as their faith community, as sources of strength and support. This can help them reach their treatment objectives.

When it comes to the underlying concerns that cause individuals to seek treatment, religious and spiritual difficulties may be crucial. Conflicts over religious ideals, crises of faith, feelings of alienation from one’s religion, and distortion of religious ideas and practices are only a few examples of what might go wrong. As part of psychotherapy, individuals may be encouraged to draw on their religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as their faith community, as sources of strength and support.

Implications for Clinical Practice

When it comes to the underlying difficulties that lead clients to seek treatment, religious and spiritual issues may be crucial considerations. Conflicts over religious ideals, crises of faith, feelings of alienation from one’s religion, and distortion of religious ideas and practices are only a few examples of what might happen. Clients’ religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as their faith group, may be sources of strength and support that may be utilized during psychotherapy to aid them in achieving their treatment objectives.

Key Ethics Issues for Psychotherapists to Consider

Religious and spiritual difficulties may be related to the underlying issues that lead people to seek treatment. Conflicts over religious ideals, crises of faith, feelings of alienation from one’s religion, and distortion of religious ideas and practices, to name a few examples; Clients’ religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as their faith community, may be sources of strength and support that may be utilized during psychotherapy to aid them in achieving their treatment objectives.

Informed consent

When it comes to psychotherapy, clients have the right to be informed of any relevant facts that may reasonably be expected to affect or impact their decision to engage in the session. In addition, informed consent should cover all reasonably accessible treatment alternatives, as well as the risks and benefits associated with each option. Based on the discussion above, it is intended that the inclusion of religious and spiritual concerns, as well as their potential importance to therapy, would be seen as mandatory.

Clinical competence

Psychotherapists must educate themselves on the main faiths, as well as spiritual beliefs and practices, in order to deliver appropriate psychotherapy to their clients. Psychotherapists should also be aware of their own limitations in terms of knowledge and clinical expertise, seeking advice from expert colleagues and members of the clergy when they are unsure of what knowledge they should have or when confronted with clinical situations that are outside their area of expertise. Before attempting to include religious or spiritual activities into psychotherapy, psychotherapists should verify that they have received thorough training and professional supervision in their field.

Consultation and collaboration with other professionals

Psychotherapists must educate themselves on the main faiths, as well as spiritual beliefs and practices, in order to give appropriate psychotherapy to their clients. The boundaries of psychotherapists’ knowledge and clinical skill should also be understood; when in doubt about what information they should have or when confronted with clinical issues beyond their scope of practice, they should seek advice from experienced colleagues and members of the clergy. Before attempting to include religious or spiritual activities into psychotherapy, psychotherapists should verify they have received thorough training and clinical supervision.

Boundaries and multiple relationships

When dealing with religious and spiritual matters with clients in psychotherapy, psychotherapists should be aware of the possibility of transitioning from the position of psychotherapist to the role of clergy. This is particularly important when incorporating religious and spiritual traditions into psychotherapy. It is also important for psychotherapists to exercise caution when forcing their ideals on clients and when adopting a prescriptive approach in treatment.

Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Psychotherapy and Ethical Decision-Making

When incorporating religious and spiritual themes into psychotherapy, a therapist may do anything from asking questions about a client’s beliefs, values, and practices to making specific values-based recommendations and encouraging clients to participate in specific religious activities and practices such as meditation or prayer. The incorporation of spiritual and religious interventions into psychotherapy may involve activities such as reading selected parts of scripture with the client in session and praying along with the client in session, among other activities.

There are a variety of decision-making models available that can assist psychotherapists in making thoughtful and informed decisions about how and when to address religious and spiritual issues with clients, as well as how and when, and when not, to incorporate religious and spiritual interventions into their psychotherapy sessions.

Each phase in their decision-making process comprises a variety of details and aspects to take into consideration, however the following are the fundamental steps of their model:

  • Assess the religious or spiritual views and preferences of the customer in a respectful manner
  • Examine the possibility of a link between the presenting problem and religious or spiritual beliefs and convictions
  • Incorporate the findings of this evaluation into the process of informed consent. Consider your countertransference to the religiousness of the client in all seriousness
  • In this situation, be honest with yourself about your abilities. Obtain the advice of professionals in the fields of religion and psychology. Whenever it is acceptable and clinically warranted, and when the client grants consent, consult with the client’s own clergy or other religious professionals. Make a judgment on whether or not to treat the client or send him or her to another provider. (Pages 159-161)
  • Evaluate the results and make adjustments to the strategy.

Recommendations

Assess the religious or spiritual views and preferences of the client in a respectful manner. Examine the possibility of a relationship between the presented situation and one’s religious or spiritual beliefs and obligations; Incorporate the findings of this evaluation into the process of informed consent; Consider your countertransference to the religiousness of the customer in all seriousness. In this particular instance, be honest about your abilities. Obtain the advice of professionals in the fields of religion and psychology.

Choose between treating the client and referring him or her to a specialist.

159-161); Evaluate the results and make adjustments to the strategy.

Religion and spirituality in the treatment room

With a kid suffering from uncontrolled attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Christian psychologist William Hathaway, PhD, of Regent University in Virginia, found himself the latest in a long line of therapists to assist a family in distress over the boy’s uncontrolled ADHD (ADHD). Asked about their religious views, Hathaway discovered that the family members were Jewish and that the boy’s conduct at the temple was keeping them from attending services. She urged them to recommit to their religious practices.

Furthermore, he believes that their religious beliefs may have aided the family in dealing with their son’s attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

‘Being able to assist a person in establishing a connection with the variable of spirituality in their life may be a helpful and crucial therapeutic accommodation,’ says the author.

This is not uncommon among psychologists.

The use of spirituality as a treatment technique According to Hathaway, “Using religion as a therapeutic technique is a bit contentious and is still in its infancy.” In addition to employing prayer during a session, there are methods for directing clients to pray, spiritual journaling, forgiveness procedures, and using biblical texts to promote positive mental and emotional habits, as well as trying to modify punitive God conceptions.

Using spiritually guided forgiveness procedures, for example, Hathaway can assist clients in coping with emotional difficulties that have arisen as a result of abuse caused by friends or family members.

Carrie Doehring, PhD, a psychologist at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver who studies how people use religion to deal with violent experiences, says that when implementing these techniques, the possibility that religion may have a negative influence on a client’s life-believing in an angry God, for example-should be carefully assessed so that therapy does not make emotional crises worse.

I then inquire as to what they think God wants from them right now, which prompts them to share their personal experiences with God,” Doehring explains.

“It is the total of that discourse that allows me to have a better understanding of the influence religion has on their lives.” Clients who are religious or spiritual benefit from the sensitivity and readiness to communicate with the therapist in a religious manner, according to Doehring, and this may bring a lovely component of the human experience into the therapy session.

  1. It is critical for all psychologists to understand how spirituality and religious beliefs are significant to them individually, both as a tool and as a method to avert psychological barriers, but there are risks to introducing religious practices into treatment, according to Dr.
  2. A significant concern for those advocating for the discipline is ensuring that therapists learning to utilize religious tools or assist clients in dealing with religious difficulties while in postdoctoral training have sufficient supervision.
  3. The personal beliefs that psychologists hold about religion, as well as the risk of countertransference difficulties, should be taken into consideration while working with clients who have religious concerns.
  4. Finally, she believes that the practice as a whole must rely on more than anecdotal therapy tactics and should instead resort to evidence-based practices.
  5. A significant corpus of high-quality work on the relationship between mental health and spirituality has lately emerged, according to Shafranske, indicating that the area has recently reached a tipping point.
  6. According to psychologist Kenneth Pargament, PhD, of Bowling Green State University, research is now being conducted to determine the efficiency of various therapeutic strategies, such as forgiveness treatments, spiritual meditation, rituals, and religious coping tools, among others.
  7. According to Pargament, the research suggests that the sense of hope, meaning, and spiritual support that clients obtain from addressing religious matters and relying on spiritual resources helps them cope better with their condition, which is supported by the facts (seepage 44).
  8. Their findings demonstrate that kidney transplant patients who turn to God or a higher power for transcendent support have greater life satisfaction following their surgery, even after accounting for the general secular coping methods used by the patients.
  9. “At this point, we’re not positive that the majority of doctors are utilizing religion or spirituality at all,” Shafranske explains.
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As Shafranske points out, only about 10 percent of new psychology PhDs report moderate to high levels of exposure to religious sensitivity or guided practices during their training, with the majority of that exposure occurring at religiously affiliated training programs at institutions such as Brigham Young University and the Fuller Theological Seminary, where the majority of the training takes place.

Making certain that religious diversity is presented as a fundamental problem in training programs is a crucial first step, according to Shafranske, and this might pave the way for postdoctoral research that focuses on the application of religious practices in practice.

In his opinion, “some of the most fundamental concerns and challenges that people encounter in life have a spiritual dimension to them.” Despite the fact that these sorts of concerns may be approached from a simply psychological perspective for many people, they have a profound existential and spiritual significance that should not be overlooked.

9 Ways to Provide Spiritual Care to Your Patients & Their Families

With a kid suffering from uncontrolled attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Christian psychologist William Hathaway, PhD, of Regent University in Virginia, found himself the latest in a long line of therapists to assist a family in distress over the boy’s ADH (ADHD). Asked about their religious views, Hathaway discovered that the family members were Jewish and that the boy’s conduct at the temple was preventing them from attending services. She encouraged them to recommit themselves to their religious traditions.

The discussion of the implications of spirituality in family life, according to him, expanded the family’s experience in the therapy session and enabled them to face religious matters as a significant component of their well-being.

According to him, simply being aware to the possibility that religion plays a part in a client’s life might extend your appraisal and lead to new answers.

It is usual for psychologists to have a greater understanding of spirituality, and for some psychologists to go even farther by actively combining religion and spirituality—two distinct but not mutually contradictory concepts—into their therapeutic procedures.

A treatment technique that incorporates spirituality According to Hathaway, “Using religion as a therapeutic technique has been contentious and is still in its early stages.” “Techniques include the use of prayer during a session, different ways to lead clients to pray, spiritual journaling, forgiveness protocols, utilizing biblical passages to reinforce positive mental and emotional habits, and trying to shift punitive God images,” according to the article.

To assist clients cope with emotional difficulties that have arisen as a consequence of harm caused by friends or family members, Hathaway employs spiritually guided forgiveness methods.

In the context of implementing these techniques, however, the possibility that religion may have a negative influence on a client’s life—for example, believing in an angry God—should be carefully assessed so that therapy does not exacerbate emotional crises, says Carrie Doehring, PhD, a psychologist at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver who studies how people use religion to deal with experiences of violence.

The client’s religious and spiritual origins are explored throughout the evaluation process, and I inquire about if they pray and whether it is beneficial to them.

“If they do believe in a personal God, I inquire as to what they think God wants from them right now.” “It is the totality of that discourse that allows me to have a better understanding of the influence of religion on their lives.” Having such sensitivity and readiness to communicate with religious or spiritual clients enables them to trust the therapist and, according to Dr.

As she explains, “Some individuals describe the beauty of spiritually led treatment as having a third presence in the room—either a spiritual presence or a God presence.” As a result of the presence of the therapist, “a riddle is disclosed to the patient; it’s a kind of epiphany that may be incredibly beneficial in treatment.” Consider these precautions: Even though spiritually guided therapies have the potential to be helpful, Doehring cautions that they should be used with caution, particularly when a therapist is new to the practice.

  1. It is critical for all psychologists to understand how spirituality and religious beliefs are significant to them individually, both as a tool and as a method to avert psychological obstacles, but there are risks to introducing religious practices into treatment, according to Dr.
  2. In order to advance the discipline, advocates must ensure that postdoctoral students who are learning to utilize religious tools or assist clients in dealing with religious difficulties have sufficient supervision while in their postdoctoral studies.
  3. The personal beliefs that psychologists hold about religion, as well as the risk of countertransference difficulties, must be taken into consideration while working with clients who have religious concerns.
  4. Finally, she believes that the practice as a whole must rely on more than anecdotal therapy procedures, and should instead focus on evidence-based treatments.

According to Edward Shafranske, PhD, a psychology professor at Pepperdine University, despite strong anecdotal evidence of the positive impact of spiritually inclined therapy, most professionals in the field agree that psychologists must develop both research and theoretical models in order to understand the connection between religion and spirituality in practice.

  1. “However, it may be premature to advocate wider usage of religion until we have excellent, solid scientific information and research about how to incorporate religion into practice,” Shafranske argues.
  2. Kenneth Pargament of Bowling Green State University’s Department of Psychology adds that research is now being conducted to determine the efficiency of certain therapy strategies, such as forgiveness treatments, spiritual mediation, rituals, and religious coping tools.
  3. According to Pargament, the data suggests that the sense of hope, significance, and spiritual support that clients acquire from addressing religious matters and relying on spiritual resources helps them cope better with their condition, which is supported by the research (seepage 44).
  4. Their findings demonstrate that kidney transplant patients who turn to God or a higher power for transcendent support have greater life satisfaction following their surgery, even after accounting for the general secular coping methods used by these patients.
  5. A rising amount of data has prompted researchers in the discipline to investigate if psychologists may be taught religious sensitivity and spiritual practice.

” As he continues, “Scripture is used very little, and prayer is used even less-which may be a good thing given so few people are taught.” As Shafranske points out, only about 10 percent of new psychology PhDs report moderate to high levels of exposure to religious sensitivity or guided practices during their training, with the majority of that exposure occurring at religiously affiliated training programs at institutions such as Brigham Young University and the Fuller Theological Seminary, where the majority of new psychology PhDs are educated.

The importance of ensuring that religious diversity is presented as a fundamental topic in training programs, according to Shafranske, is an essential first step that might pave the way for postdoctoral research that focuses on the application of religious practices in practice.

In his words, “some of the most fundamental concerns and difficulties that people encounter in life have a spiritual dimension to them.” Despite the fact that these types of problems may be approached from a simply psychological perspective for many people, they have a profound existential and spiritual significance that should not be overlooked.

1. Take Your Cues from the Patient

Because patients are guests in our hospitals, it is critical to allow them to take the initiative throughout each visit. Don’t try to bring up themes such as church or religion in your conversation. Instead, begin by inquiring about their health and the circumstances that led them to the hospital. Taking note of your patient’s nonverbal signs will help you better understand what they are thinking and feeling at the time. When patients are in need of something, they may try to be polite by not expressing themselves.

To provide spiritual support, it’s first necessary to attend to your patient’s physical requirements, which may include changing his or her bed, turning off the television so they can have some quiet time, or assisting them to the toilet.

2. Demonstrate a Christ-like Attitude

Treat your patients with the same compassion that God has for you! Never only say you love someone; actually love them and look for the good in them is what is required. That means treating them as though they are the person who has the most value in your life, regardless of whether you agree with what they say or how they treat you. Always keep in mind that love is not always an emotion. There are moments when you must make a conscious decision to smile even if you don’t feel like doing so, to make eye contact, to listen effectively with a loving heart, and to serve without expecting anything in return.

3. Ask the Patient How You Can Support Them Spiritually

In order to give spiritual care, one of the simplest methods is to simply ask patients how you can best assist them and then do your best to fulfill their request. When a Greek Orthodox Christian client requests to speak with a priest before going into surgery, phone the Greek Orthodox Church in your neighborhood and see if the priest would be willing to pay them a visit before the procedure. Always remember, though, not to promise your patient something you aren’t confident you will be able to achieve.

If the priest is not accessible, offer to contact a chaplain on the patient’s behalf or to pray with him or her in private.

4. Support Patients Within Their Own Faith Tradition

While delivering spiritual care is not intended to convert patients to your religion, it can assist them in making contact with the divine if they so want. Keep in mind that they are a captive audience, frequently confined to a hospital bed that they do not want to be in when you are interacting with them. In these situations, it is always proper to display God’s love and compassion, but it is not fair to tell patients what they should believe or how they should think. I am well aware that this is an area that might cause internal struggle for caregivers who desire to remain faithful to their own religious or philosophical convictions.

Consider this scenario: When I pray with patients who are not Christian believers, I make certain that the words I use do not clash with my own religious convictions.

Also keep in mind that, at the end of the day, people do not convert other people to their beliefs. Only God has the ability to alter hearts.

5. Listen to FearsConcerns Without Going into Your Own Stuff

Whenever someone begins to express their concerns to you, it’s natural to respond with, “I understand how you feel,” and then to embark into a tale about one of your own experiences. Keep in mind, though, that you are there to care for the patient, not the other way around. For emotional and spiritual support, I’ve found that naming the emotions you hear patients or family members express and then asking a follow-up question is far more effective than simply listening. In this case, you may respond, “I can sense a great deal of anxiety in your comments.

” Alternatively, “You appear to be in a bad mood.” “Can you tell me what’s going on?” I inquire.

Instead, simply interpret it as a hint that the time isn’t appropriate for you.

6. Ask if You Can Pray with Them

Sometimes caregivers are confused of how or when to approach a patient and ask if they would want to be blessed. Generally speaking, if your patient is in distress, you should inquire as to whether or not you may pray for them on their behalf. “Mrs. Jones, would you mind if I said a little prayer for you?” is a common phrase I use. “Thank you for your time.” The word “short” is significant because it communicates to the patient that, even if they don’t understand what you’re going to say, they will most likely be able to accept it since it will be brief at the very least.

7. Share an Encouraging Thought or Word

Scripture has a remarkable ability to elevate people’s spirits and provide encouragement. Psalm 46:10 is one of my favorite Bible verses to share with patients, and it comes from the book of Psalms. “Be quiet, and know that I am God,” the verse states. When I read this scripture to frightened patients, I encourage them to remain cool, take a deep breath, accept that they are in the presence of God, and trust that God will take care of them. What sections of Scripture speak to you on a deep level?

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8. Use the Gifts of PresenceTouch

Scripture has a remarkable ability to elevate people’s spirits and give them hope and motivation. Psalm 46:10 is one of my favorite Bible scriptures to share with patients, and it is taken from the book of Isaiah. ‘Be quiet, and know that I am God,’ the verse states. In sharing this text with patients who are anxious, I encourage them to remain calm, take a deep breath, accept that they are in God’s presence, and trust that God will take care of them. When you read the Bible, what passages stand out to you the most?

9. Join a Team that Supports Spiritual Care

Consider joining our team at AdventHealth if you want to work in an atmosphere where you’ll be encouraged to deliver whole person care to patients and families.

We’re constantly on the lookout for outstanding team members who see healthcare as a form of ministry and who are ready to assist you in using your skills to benefit others. Prayer, spiritual care, whole person care, mission, and healthcare as ministry are some of the topics covered.

Bio-Psycho Social-Spiritual Model

In all of our instruction, we encourage students to think about patient problems in terms of a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework. In psychiatry, this paradigm is employed throughout the course of the program. Finally, we want students to come to patient formulations that allow for comprehension and aid in the development of a treatment plan for the patient. Formulas aid in the explanation of “how this patient came to be in this psychological condition.” The components of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual formulation are described in detail in the next section.

Students are urged to incorporate all of the components into their formulas.

Biological

  • Consider whether you have any blood relations who have suffered from mental disorders, substance abuse disorders, or attempted or completed suicides. What is the history of close relatives who have been admitted to a mental institution for psychiatric reasons? What types of therapy did they get, and how did they respond?
History of Pregnancy and Birth:
  • Consider the following pregnancy variables: Is it possible that the mother was exposed to nicotine, alcohol, pharmaceuticals, or other drugs while she was pregnant? Anything out of the ordinary regarding pregnancy
  • Birth problems, such as preterm, birth trauma, or prolonged durations of hospitalization, should be recorded.
Relevant Previous Illnesses
  • Think about whether you have a history of head injuries, endocrine issues (thyroid or adrenal), seizures, malignancies, or neurological conditions. Keep in mind that prior substance abuse may have had long-term consequences for some brain processes such as cognition and emotional control, among others.

Present

  • Existing diseases and any direct influence they may have on a patient’s psychological presentation should be noted.
Medications:
  • Determine the effectiveness of your current pharmaceutical regimen. Consider whether the drugs in question (e.g., steroids, beta blockers, pain relievers, benzodiazepines, SSRIs, antipsychotics) have any psychoactive effects on the patient. Take into account the potential negative effects of present drugs.
Substances:
  • Analyze the relationship between present mental symptoms and the use of nicotine, alcohol, and street drugs
  • Analyze the potential consequences of substance withdrawal

Psychological

  • Consider any previous history of trauma (child abuse, combat, rape, major disease), as well as resiliency (how the patient dealt with trauma, for example, via the support of friends, family, or religious beliefs)
  • Consider the sources of a positive self-image and positive role models in your life. Explain how you felt when you lost someone you loved
  • Comment on the quality of the patient’s interactions with important persons, such as grandparents, friends, notable teachers, or significant employers, among others. Discuss the influence of previous medical difficulties, substance abuse problems, or mental disorders on the patient’s development, as well as the relevance of these issues to the patient now.

Present

  • In your description, including any recent events or experiences that led to the admission or appointment. What are some of the current stressors in your life? Is there any symbolic significance to them
  • In this section, you will be asked to evaluate and remark on your coping abilities, defensive mechanisms, and the presence or absence of cognitive distortions. Consider the person’s present developmental needs, such as those associated with marriage, divorce, birth, children leaving home, loss, aging, and so on. Where is the patient currently in terms of his or her development? Is it suitable in this situation? What is the developmental ramifications of the patient’s disease
  • And

Social

  • What level of support is currently available to the patient
  • And When it comes to connections with significant people, what is the present state of affairs? What are some of the potential peer influences? Take into consideration the patient’s existing living situation. Observations on one’s professional and financial situation
  • Provide your thoughts on any pertinent legal issues
  • Remember to take into account the impact of other agencies (such as the Veterans Administration, Child Protective Services, and the Criminal Justice System) on the patient. Comment on cultural elements that may be having an impact on the current situation and that may be having an impact on therapy.

Spiritual

  • Comment on the patient’s spirituality and its significance in his or her life. Is the patient a member of a religious or spiritual community of some kind? What role does spirituality play in a patient’s ability to hope, their perspective on suicide (if applicable), or their interaction with a supportive community?

Examples of the Types of Questions to Ask During Your Interviews Based on the Bio-Psycho-Social-Spiritual Model This course’s small group discussions and case presentations are intended to teach students the skills that will assist them in developing a viable bio-psycho-social-spiritual formulation for their situation. This approach is presented in the first year of medical school and is utilized throughout our psychiatric program. In order to address the components of the bio-psycho-social-spiritual model, you will want to assemble information from your diagnostic interviews that will help you to address them.

We’ve included signals to assist you in eliciting pertinent information.

Biological

  • If your family has a history of mental illness or suicide attempts, please tell me about it. Share any information you have regarding relatives who have been hospitalized for mental Masons. Please tell me whether you have any relatives who may have suffered from emotional difficulties. What therapies were administered to them, and how did they respond to those treatments
History of Pregnancy and Birth:
  • Please tell me about your mother’s pregnancy while you were growing up. Do you have any information on whether she smoked, drank, or used any medications? When it comes to your real birth, what have you been told? Were there any issues throughout the birthing process?
Relevant Previous Illnesses:
  • If you’ve had any severe medical difficulties in your life, please tell me about them. What is your medical history, including any previous head injuries, endocrine diseases (such as thyroid and adrenal), seizures, malignancies, and neurologic illnesses?

Present

  • Can you tell me about your current state of health? Do you have any ailments that you’re dealing with right now? Do you have concerns that you may be suffering from a condition that has not been identified?
Medications:
  • Could you please tell me about the drugs you are taking, both prescribed and non-prescribed? (Check for psychoactive medicines such as steroids, beta blockers, pain relievers, benzodiazepines, SSRIs, and herbal treatments.)
Substances:
  • Can you tell me if you consume alcoholic beverages or utilize illegal street drugs? (Consider if the patient’s present substance abuse might be a contributing factor to his or her mental symptoms.)

Psychological

  • What were your experiences like as a child? (Explore the possibility of trauma while also looking for evidence of familial strengths.) Can you tell me about any traumatic events that you have gone through in your life? (Conduct a military/combat investigation as well as checks for rape, violence, and significant disease.) What kinds of losses have you faced and how did you cope with them. How did you deal with this situation? Explain your ties with important people in your life, such as your parents or grandparents or friends. Also describe your interactions with important teachers or employers. What impact have medical or psychological difficulties had on your life in the past had on your current life
  • And

Present

  • Tell me about the recent events and experiences that have brought you to this point in time. How have you attempted to resolve your issues in the past? (Check for coping mechanisms.) How do you deal with unpleasant life events on a regular basis? Investigation and observation of defensive systems
  • Tell me about your experiences dealing with marriage, divorce, birth, children leaving home, loss, aging, and so on. I’d love to hear your stories. To gain an understanding of the developmental demands placed on the individual at this time, go to the previous section. What impact do your present medical or psychological conditions have on your day-to-day activities?

Social

  • If you want assistance, please tell me who you tum to. Do you have friends or family members that you can turn to for assistance if you need it? Tell me about the people who provide you with companionship, support, and entertainment. Do you have friends or family members on whom you can count for company, support, and entertainment? Describe your current social life and how it differs from others. Is it common for you to get together with individuals that you can connect to, and do you find it enjoyable? When you were feeling better, explain the type of social life you were involved in. Approximately how frequently did you get together with persons you could connect to
  • I’d want to know about your current living arrangements. It has met your expectations, haven’t you? Tell me about your professional experience. Are you currently employed? Is your job fulfilling, or do you require assistance in this area? Please tell me about your financial situation. Can you tell me about your cultural/family values that can help me gain a better feel of your current life situation/symptoms in order to better understand you?

Spiritual

  • If I ask you to describe your spiritual belief system, I’d like to know how you meet your spiritual demands. Could you tell me a little bit about your religious organization? If possible, tell me about your religious upbringing in childhood.

Treatment Plan for Biopsychosocial and Spiritual Disorders Making use of the Bio Psycho Social Spiritual formulation will help you arrange your therapy sessions more effectively. It is important for us that all of your treatment plans, both for this course and for our clerkship, contain comments in each of the categories listed below. As with the formulation, each patient’s treatment plan is unique, and this guidance may serve as a starting point for those who are unfamiliar with the process.

Biological

In order to “work up” present medical and psychological symptoms, lab tests are performed (i.e. thyroid, metabolic panel, Urine Drug Screen, blood alcohol level, current blood level of medication if relevant) Consider the following scenario: (i.e. MRI, chest X-ray) Other tests include EEGs, biopsies, and so on.

Therapeutic:

Treatment of the existing sickness as well as any accompanying symptoms Antidepressants, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and other medications are used to treat the underlying mental condition. Treatment for drug use disorder includes medications like methadone, alcohol withdrawal regimen, nicotine replacement therapy, and other treatments. Medications for symptom alleviation include sleeping pills and pain relievers.

Antibiotics and other medications for different medical issues, as well as lifestyle recommendations such as exercise and diet modifications Describe your reasoning for picking or not choosing a biological treatment for specific problems with specific patients. Give examples of your reasoning.

Psychological

Psychological testing, including personality, intelligence, and other pertinent examinations. Behaviors and personality types that were seen during the interview or reported by employees. More information may be obtained by calling the following number: (examine old data, consult with outside doctors, consult with family) with written permission

Treatment:

Behavioral therapies such as DBT, relaxation therapy, behavioral activation, social skills training, coping skills development as well as cognitive behavioral therapy or psychodynamic therapy may be used in individual psychotherapy (be prepared to defend your choice of treatment for this patient). Couples therapy and group therapy are both options (tailored to patient, many choices, may include 12 step). Provide a justification for why you are or are not recommending a certain style of psychotherapy.

Social

Evaluation of the patient’s social and financial resources, as well as his or her eligibility for different assistance programs (housing, Vocational Rehabilitation, Medicaid, GA, etc.)

Therapeutic:

Assistance with housing, job training, and benefit groups are all available (may include 12 Step, “Self-Help,” Reminiscence, Clubs, etc.) Hobbies should be encouraged, as should social activities and family gatherings. Provide a rationale for why these types of services are or are not recommended. Are there any treatments that might be used to reduce social obstacles to treatment that are already available?

Spiritual

An evaluation of the patient’s previous religious and spiritual associations is performed.

Therapeutic:

Recognizing and locating resources such as organized religious activities, meditation/mindfulness training, and support groups (may include 12 step). Provide a rationale for why these types of services are or are not recommended.

Other:

Treatment Options: Inpatient vs. Outpatient (Would you admit, discharge, or maintain current level of care?) Legal 2000 (Does the patient satisfy the requirements?) Removal of guns from the house Mandatory Reporting (child abuse, elder abuse, etc.) (Are there any Tarasoff considerations?)

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