Where Can I Post Some Interviews About Spirituality? (Best solution)

How do you find your spiritual life?

  • Some may find that their spiritual life is intricately linked to their association with a church, temple, mosque, or synagogue. Others may pray or find comfort in a personal relationship with God or a higher power. Still others seek meaning through their connections to nature or art.

What is a spiritual interview?

The purpose of conducting spiritual interviews is to prove the existence of the Spirit World, reincarnation and guardian spirits, and to enlighten people of the truth and diversity of the Spirit World.

How do I become a spiritual podcast?

These Podcasts Will Get You In Touch With Your Spiritual Side

  1. 1 of 11. The One You Feed.
  2. 2 of 11. Self Service.
  3. 4 of 11. Spark My Muse.
  4. 5 of 11. Interfaith Voices.
  5. 8 of 11. Oh No, Ross and Carrie!
  6. 11 of 11. Tara Brach.

How do you ask someone about their spirituality?

Here is a list that may help get you started.

  1. Is religion important to you?
  2. When you have problems or questions, who do you turn to for help?
  3. From what or whom do you draw the strength to endure a difficult situation?
  4. When you pray, to whom do you pray?
  5. What do you think happens after our life here?

How do you interview someone about their religion?

The Interview:

  1. What do you think is the most fundamental aspect(s) of your religion?
  2. What do you want others to know about your religion?
  3. What do you think is the most unique aspect of your religion?
  4. What makes you a strong believer in your faith?
  5. What are some of your religious traditions, rituals?

What are spiritual questions?

Here are 40 of the most thought-provoking spiritual questions!

  • What should be humanity’s goal?
  • Should everyone on the planet be striving toward a common goal?
  • Can you think of something that everyone could agree on, despite the chaotic world we live in?
  • What’s the most sensible thing you’ve ever heard someone say?

How many spirituality podcasts are there?

Podcast Stats Soundbite 1: Religious Podcasts Dominate Of the 660,000+ podcasts in the Blubrry Podcast Directory, there are just over 92,000 podcasts in the Religious category.

What happens when you have a spiritual awakening?

The spiritual awakening. You begin to clear certain things out of your life (habits, relationships, old belief systems) and invite new, more enriching things in. You may feel like something is missing, but you haven’t quite figured it out yet. During this phase, it’s common to feel lost, confused, and down.

What is spiritual podcast?

Religious or spiritual podcasts make you feel like you are part of a community. They offer seekers an intimate look at the culture around a particular faith and how it impacts the lives of the followers.

How do you ask a question spiritually?

20 Questions For Every Spiritual Seeker

  1. Why is there poverty and suffering in the world?
  2. What is the relationship between science and religion?
  3. Why are so many people depressed?
  4. What are we all so afraid of?
  5. When is war justifiable?
  6. How would God want us to respond to aggression and terrorism?

How do you start a spiritual talk?

7 Questions to Start a Spiritual Conversation with Family

  1. How’s life going these days?
  2. What’s the best thing going on in your life right now?
  3. What’s been the thing you lean on when life gets hard?
  4. What is one thing you would like to be remembered for?
  5. What role would you say faith plays in your life?

How do you initiate a spiritual conversation?

6 Keys to Starting a Spiritual Conversation

  1. Start. The first step to transitioning into a conversation about spiritual matters is to start the conversation.
  2. Ask questions.
  3. Listen more than you talk.
  4. Look out for keywords and common ground.
  5. Shift the conversation gently.
  6. Connect again.

What’s the difference between being spiritual and being religious?

What’s the difference between religion and spirituality? Religion: This is a specific set of organised beliefs and practices, usually shared by a community or group. Spirituality: This is more of an individual practice, and has to do with having a sense of peace and purpose.

Can you believe in God but not go to church?

Most people who stop attending church services still believe in God, according to new research commissioned by the Church of Scotland. Many who no longer attend church choose to express their faith in new ways, said Scotland’s national Church.

What should I ask a religious person?

Here are 50 questions that a nonbeliever may ask a believer to try and understand religion a bit more.

  • What religion do you believe in?
  • Do you believe in God or another deity?
  • When did you choose your faith?
  • What is your idea of what God looks like?
  • Is there a heaven?
  • Is there a hell?
  • What does heaven look like?

8 Podcasts for the Spiritual Searcher (Published 2019)

More Americans than ever before identify as either atheists, agnostics, or religiously unaffiliated, raising the possibility that organized religion is on its way out. Despite this, spirituality’s hold on humanity remains strong, with the search for meaning just taking various pathways. In recent years, an increasing percentage of Americans have identified as “spiritual but not religious,” a development that coincides with an expansion of interest in techniques such as meditation and astrology that are not associated with conventional religious beliefs.

Smart, faith-minded hosts have been making shows that examine their belief systems without promoting stereotypes or repeating dogma for a long time prior to the current podcast boom.

‘On Being’

Krista Tippett’s new book, “On Being,” explores what it means to be human and live well via talks with scientists, artists, politicians, and other thought leaders. Not on any one religious system or denomination, but on the abstract forces – beauty, nature, loss — that might form one’s inner existence are the primary subject of this book. While the show’s creator, Tippett, was honored with the National Humanities Medal in 2014 for her work on the show, the Obama White House applauded her for “embracing complexity and encouraging individuals of all religions, no faith, and every background to join the discourse.” That continues to be a strong suit for the show today.

(Nov.

‘Oprah’s SuperSoul Conversations’

Week after week, Oprah Winfrey sits down with artists, leaders, and entrepreneurs in a format that fosters honesty and self-reflection, bringing her signature empathy to the table. A offshoot of Oprah Winfrey’s OWN show “SuperSoul Sunday,” the podcast is strongly tied with the mindfulness philosophy, as Winfrey invites listeners to “take time to be more completely present” and “better connected to the deeper world around us.” Though some episodes are overtly religious in nature — recent guests have included the evangelical Christian pastor Rob Bell and the influential Franciscan friar Richard Rohr — the majority of episodes take a broader view of spirituality and have included timely gems such as Reese Witherspoon discussing the #MeToo movement in the entertainment industry.

For anyone unfamiliar with the genre of religion and spirituality, this is an excellent introduction. “Norman Lear: Lessons on Longevity” (Dec. 27, 2017), and “Marianne Williamson: The Spiritual Purpose of Relationships” (Dec. 27, 2017) are two of the show’s premiere episodes (May 8, 2019)

‘The RobCast’

Week after week, Oprah Winfrey sits down with artists, leaders, and entrepreneurs in a framework that invites honesty and self-reflection, bringing her distinctive empathy to each conversation. “SuperSoul Sunday” is a spinoff of Winfrey’s OWN show “SuperSoul Sunday,” and the podcast is strongly related with the notion of mindfulness in that Winfrey invites listeners to “take time to be more completely present” and “better connected to the deeper world around us.” Though some episodes are overtly religious in nature — recent guests have included the evangelical Christian pastor Rob Bell and the influential Franciscan friar Richard Rohr — the majority of episodes take a broader view of spirituality and have included timely gems such as Reese Witherspoon discussing the #MeToo movement in entertainment.

It’s a good gateway drug if religion and spirituality aren’t your normal genres.

27, 2017), and “Marianne Williamson: The Spiritual Purpose of Relationships” (Dec.

‘Tell Them, I Am’

Even while it is not overtly about Islam, this new show from Southern California Public Radio contains entirely Muslim voices in its debut season, which was distributed over a period of five consecutive weekdays during Ramadan this year. In each episode, Misha Euceph begins with a small tale from her own life, which frequently revolves on her experience of immigrating to the United States from Pakistan when she was 12 years old. This is followed by interviews in which guests — who have included Tan France (the fashion expert on the Netflix show “Queer Eye”), the comic Ramy Youssef, and G.

Marvel” comic book — recount the events that shaped their personal and professional lives.

Episode 9: “Sahar” (airing on May 16, 2019), and Episode 22: “Akbar” (airing on May 16, 2019).

‘The Potter’s Touch’

Since creating the Potter’s House, a 30,000-member nondenominational megachurch in Dallas, Bishop T.D. Jakes has established himself as one of the country’s most well-known pastors. What “The Potter’s Touch” lacks in production standards, it more than makes up for in pure intensity and vigor, courtesy to Jakes’ deep, sonorous baritone and natural ability to persuade with his oratory skills. As with Jakes’ sermons, the majority of the episodes are just re-recorded versions of Jakes’ sermons, which frequently utilize religion as a springboard for conversations about personal turmoil and even mental illness, as in a noteworthy episode from last year titled “When Anxiety Attacks.” Despite the fact that it is difficult to watch for those who are not predisposed to the megachurch style of worship, the show gives a unique view into the worshiping habits of large areas of the United States.

Starter episodes include: “When Anxiety Attacks” (April 8, 2018), “Bridging the Racial Divide with Miles McPherson” (April 8, 2018), and “When Anxiety Attacks” (April 8, 2018). (Aug. 25, 2018)

‘Oh No, Ross and Carrie!’

Blocher and Poppy, both formerly evangelical Christians, channel their shared fascination with belief into this weekly show, which turns skepticism into a wry, revelatory art form. Ross Blocher and Carrie Poppy are former evangelical Christians who channel their mutual fascination with belief into this weekly show. “Oh No, Ross and Carrie!” permits the duo to go undercover and investigate religious organizations, cults, and fringe science, after which they return to the studio to debate their discoveries.

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Blocher and Poppy rank their subjects in a range of areas at the conclusion of each investigation, including creepiness, danger, and pseudoscience, such that the show serves as both entertainment and a type of public service.

(March 1, 2015)

‘Tara Brach’

If you’re seeking for a simple, audio-based alternative to the overwhelming amount of meditation and mindfulness applications available on the market, Tara Brach, a psychologist and Buddhist meditation instructor, offers a weekly dose of Zen on her website. Brach addresses the high notion of spiritual awakening with more real everyday difficulties like as anxiety, conflict, and sleeplessness, using a combination of guided meditations and motivational talks to achieve his goals. And, perhaps most importantly, she tackles the frequent stumbling blocks that make it difficult to maintain a meditation routine.

(Nov.

‘Joel Osteen Podcast’

Evangelist and megachurch leader Joel Osteen has amassed a large and loyal following while also stirring up much controversy with his preaching of the “prosperity gospel,” which holds that there is a connection between Christian faith and financial success. A new edition of the podcast is released every few days, and it features uplifting sermons from Osteen and his wife, Victoria, who is also a pastor at Lakewood. The sermons tend to be more about cognitive patterns than they are about scripture, according to Osteen.

In addition to Christians looking for on-demand sermons, Osteen’s unique position within his community may make the broadcast a worthwhile listen even for atheists, who may find the show to be enlightening and entertaining.

Season one premieres on May 12, 2019, with “Buried Alive” and “You Have What You Need,” respectively (Jan. 30, 2019)

‘On Being’ host Krista Tippett on the spiritual life of a religion reporter

Being a religion reporter provides a plenty of discussion starters. When given the green light that they are in a secure and respectful environment, individuals are eager to discuss the things that make their own socks roll up and down (spiritually speaking), and they frequently express an interest in learning more about me and my beliefs. Unfortunately, in these troubled times, when numerous ethnic and religious disputes are raging, one of the most often asked questions I receive is: Has covering religion soured me on it?

  • Others have experienced something similar.
  • I went in with the mindset of an anthropology and walked out with the mindset of a believer.
  • Which is one of the reasons I was overjoyed to learn that a significant honor — the 2013 National Humanities Medal— had been given to a religious reporter by a sitting president of the United States!
  • Its radio show, “On Being,” is broadcast on 334 radio stations, and its podcast is downloaded 1.5 million times every month on iTunes.
  • Tippett received the honor, which was announced last week, for “thoughtfully digging into the riddles of human life,” according to the White House.
  • I couldn’t help but wonder about Tippett the same thing that others have wondered about me: “Does Tippett have a girlfriend?” What effect does all of this investigation have on her faith?
  • We began with her response to the following question: “How has religion reporting influenced your personal faith?” I was raised as a Southern Baptist.

People who truly value mystery may be found in the company of highly intelligent persons, and even at the center of things such as religious people who are engaged in the most beneficial discourse with science or other religions, according to my observations.

It’s extremely real for me, and it’s lot more expansive than it was even ten years ago, which is incredible.

And what about when you first launched “On Being” in 2003 (back when it was known as “Speaking of Faith”?) In the early 2000s, we had a lot of religious voices who were quite political making headlines.

Next came the sex abuse scandals, but as you and I both know, that is not the full picture when it comes to faith.

When it comes to religious voices and lives, the finest ones are the ones who are the last to go in front of microphones.

When you first began out, how did others see you?

It’s completely illogical.

If I don’t have a personal stake, some inside knowledge, or some inside information, to say that I have a religious life is like saying that the economic reporter has a financial life, since it’s not true.

It is possible that we would ask for government grant money in the future, and in the beginning, there was a lot of hesitation: Can you talk about this?

No one, I believe, considered the use of the word “mystery” to be legitimate language at the time.

What criteria do you use to determine your own religious beliefs?

I was reared as a Southern Baptist, but for a period of time, I was not religious in any way.

The amount of time I devote to religion and the traditions I follow evolve with time.

People may pick employment based on their personal requirements.

In my twenties, I was highly political.

At the time I found myself emerging from a divided Berlin and asking, to my own surprise, religious and spiritual issues, as well as moving toward the serious consideration of religion, I wasn’t certain that it was possible to have both a mind and a meaningful religious life.

I couldn’t take religion seriously if I didn’t have a healthy mental life to go along with it.

I stated at the outset of the radio program that I believed it was possible to have a show about faith, on public radio, that included all of the ideals of intelligence and balance.

Is your job as a religiously focused journalist different from your previous involvement in your community?

I am the mother of two children (a daughter, 20, and son, 15).

They’d stick a pin in my head if I ever started to think I was a sage again.

What is the current state of the show?

There are still some who question whether this type of information belongs on public radio, but the world has evolved dramatically in recent years.

There are a large number of young individuals flooding into the area.

That’s the only way I can think of to describe it.

And they describe themselves in a variety of ways that are both diverse and changeable.

But don’t you ever have the need to get into a heated debate with someone?

At the moment, I don’t have any folks who are at the poles.

However, the majority of us fall somewhere in the center.

When it comes to journalism, there’s this thing where there’s a veneration for the difficult question.

Trying to truly pull someone out is as personal as sex if I’m trying to really bring them out of their own self.

I do ask questions that are difficult to answer.

Because I spend my whole day as a writer interacting with people about religious and spiritual topics, I’ve noticed that it may sometimes feel like that’s the most important aspect of my own faith life.

Is it possible for your profession as a religion reporter to become your religious practice? A quote from Karen Armstrong once said, ‘My labor is my prayer.’ Yes, it does feel like a vocation, a calling, to be doing this. It’s a rewarding experience.

At the Crossroads of Health and Spirituality: An Interview with Joanne Braxton

Having the job of a religion reporter provides endless conversational material. Whenever they are given the green light that they are in a safe and respectful environment, people are eager to share the things that make their own socks roll up and down (in a spiritual sense), and they frequently inquire about me and my beliefs. Because of the many tribal and religious conflicts that are raging these days, I am frequently asked if covering religion has tainted my opinion of it. What has weakened my faith more than seeing the seemingly endless tide of religious prejudice that flows around the world?

  1. The God Beat, as some refer to it, has, I believe, had the opposite effect on me after eight years.
  2. To hear about the very real impact of the transcendent on people day in and day out is simply inspiring, there is no other way to put it.
  3. When it comes to covering religion, Krista Tippetti is the big fish in a small pond of journalists who cover the subject.
  4. If there is anyone else that covers religious and spiritual topics with an audience of that scale, I’m very confident it isn’t you.
  5. The job description isn’t too shabby, either.
  6. Tippett was gracious enough to conduct an interview with me when she was in Washington for the award.
  7. My understanding is that the word’mystery,’ this notion of the boundaries of your own knowledge, and the concept of an open space were all frightening concepts that you didn’t want to confront front on.

If you asked me ten years ago if such a large work was a joy in mystery, I doubt I would have responded.

Things that are difficult to pin down and comprehend keep us enthralled.

Violence in the name of religion made headlines around the time of September 11.

Trying to cover the finest of religion can be difficult since the best of religion is characterized by virtues of humility is difficult.

In a modest way, it’s a narrative about the kindness that may be found in the everyday.

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During my first ten years in journalism, there was a widespread suspicion that I was a person of religion, and that this in some way constituted me incapable of being impartial or even rational.

I recognize that this is a 20 th century prejudice, but you wouldn’t put your faith in a political reporter who didn’t vote in a presidential election.

That doesn’t really say anything.

Possibly anything religious in nature might be promoted.

The implication here is that the world has shifted in some ways.

Although I’m a fairly typical American, I don’t attend to church every Sunday at the moment.

Having been brought up as a Southern Baptist, I went through a period of being completely unaffiliated with any religion.

When it comes to going to church, my attendance patterns and religious practices have evolved throughout time.

People pick employment for a variety of reasons, including financial security.

In my twenties, I was quite political.

My personal astonishment in asking religious and spiritual questions and gravitating toward taking religion seriously occurred when I found myself emerging from a divided Berlin.

Those were the questions I brought up when I applied to divinity schools.

And then there was the Moral Majority, which was such a small and anti-intellectual slice of religion when I came out in the mid-90s.

An open-minded religious environment would be created in this setting.

Among your family and friends, are you known as the “rabbi,” the one who people seek out when they have questions about morality.

They serve as a grounding factor for me.

With the people closest to you, it might be the most difficult to live up to your principles in some situations.

– With 334 stations presently, we’ve grown from the first 2 stations.

The podcast, which receives 1.5 million downloads per month, is one of the fastest growing aspects of the company right now.

They sincerely desire to be fully functioning human beings in all aspects.

They will have to recreate the institutions that they grew up with: what education looks like, what politics looks like, what the church looks like, and so forth.

Openness is the theme of the show throughout.

I should have clarified that we do not welcome the vehement voices on any side of the political spectrum.

Because those individuals already receive a great deal of attention, and also because I believe we frame so many of our most significant arguments in terms of the two poles, I believe this is a reasonable assumption.

The middle is something I’m not sure exists, so that’s not what we’re aiming for either.’ When it comes to journalism, there is a certain veneration for a challenging question.

If I’m trying to genuinely bring someone out of themselves, it’s as personal as sex if I’m truly drawing them out of themselves.

It’s only if I have someone on the show that they have something worthwhile to say.

Does it seem like your profession as a religion reporter has the potential to evolve into a religious practice? In the words of Karen Armstrong, “My job is my prayer.” In a way, it feels like I’ve been given a vocation, a call. What a wonderful experience!

Digesting Prayerbook Spirituality: An Interview & a Giveaway

Being a religion reporter provides a plenty of discussion starters. When given the green light that they are in a secure and respectful environment, individuals are eager to discuss the things that make their own socks roll up and down (spiritually speaking), and they frequently express an interest in learning more about me and my beliefs as well. Unfortunately, in these troubled times, when numerous ethnic and religious wars are raging, one of the most often asked questions I receive is: Has covering religion tainted my opinion of it?

  • That has occurred to other people as well.
  • I went in with more of an anthropologist mindset and came out with a more religious one.
  • This is one of the reasons I was overjoyed to learn that a major award — the 2013 National Humanities Medal— had been given to a religion reporter by a sitting president of the United States!
  • Her radio show “On Being” is broadcast on 334 radio stations, and her podcast is downloaded 1.5 million times per month.
  • Tippett was given the award last week, according to the White House, for “thoughtfully delving into the mysteries of human existence.” That’s not a bad job description, is it?
  • Tippett was gracious enough to conduct an interview with me while in Washington for the award ceremony, beginning with her response to the following question: “How has religion reporting impacted your own faith?” I was brought up as a Southern Baptist.
  • People who truly honor mystery can be found in the company of very wise people, and even at the heart of things such as religious people who are engaged in the most fruitful dialogue with science or other faiths, according to me.

It’s very real for me, and it’s much more expansive than it was even ten years ago, which is amazing.

What happened back in 2003, when you first started “On Being” (then known as “Speaking of Faith”)?

Then there was the violence in the name of religion that occurred around the time of September 11.

It’s difficult to cover the best of religion because the best of religion embodies humility in its highest form.

I like that it’s a quiet story, that it’s a story about everyday goodness.

Ten years ago, there was some trepidation within public radio that I was a person of faith, and that this in some way rendered me unable to be objective or even reasonable.

I recognize that this is a 20 th century bias, but you wouldn’t put your trust in a political reporter who didn’t vote in the election.

That doesn’t really say anything.

Is it possible to promote something that has to do with religion?

All of this is a hint that the world has changed.

I’m a fairly typical American; right now, I don’t attend church every Sunday, but that hasn’t always been the case and isn’t likely to be the case in the future.

I’ve converted to Christianity.

The bottom line is that Christianity is my first language, and that is still true today as it was ten years ago.

When choosing a job, did you have a particular question in mind, or were you looking for an answer to a particular question?

After growing up in a religiously infused environment, I decided to become non-religious.

I wasn’t convinced that you could have both a life of the mind and a deep religious life at the same time.

I couldn’t take religion seriously if I didn’t have a healthy mental life to support it.

I stated at the outset of the radio show that I believed it was possible to have a show on faith on public radio that embodied all of the values of intelligence and balance.

Is your role in your community different now that you are a religion-oriented journalist?

My family consists of two children (a daughter, 20, and son, 15).

They’d put a pin in my head if I ever started to feel like a sage.

How’s the show doing right now, anyway?

There are still some skeptics who question whether this type of content belongs on public radio, but the world has changed dramatically.

There are a large number of young people flooding into the space.

That’s the only way I can think of putting it.

And they define themselves in a variety of ways that are both fluid and diverse.

But, don’t you ever get the urge to get into a heated debate with someone?

I don’t have any people who are stationed at the poles, unfortunately.

However, the vast majority of us fall somewhere in the middle.

In journalism, there’s this thing where there’s a reverence for the difficult question.

If I’m trying to really draw someone out of themselves, it’s as intimate as sex if I’m succeeding.

I do ask questions that are thought-provoking.

Because I spend my entire day as a reporter interacting with people about religious and spiritual issues, I find that it can sometimes feel like that is the most important part of my own faith life.

Is it possible for your job as a religion reporter to turn into a religious practice? In the words of Karen Armstrong, ‘My work is my prayer.’ Yes, it does feel like a vocation, a calling, at times. It’s a very rewarding experience.

Spirit, Soul, and the Secular: An Interview with Thomas Moore

Bonnie Bright, Ph.D., has written a guest article for us. Depth psychology is frequently related with the concept of “soul.” Many prominent minds in the area have contributed some essential insights on the subject, and maybe none more so than psychologist and novelist, Thomas Moore, whose best-selling book, Care of the Soul, is one of the most known and regarded books on the subject in recent history. In recognition of Pacifica’s 40th anniversary in April 2016, Thomas Moore will deliver a keynote address at the Climates of Changeconference in Washington, DC.

  • My first request was that he explain the distinction between spirit and soul.
  • Moore’s grasp of the subject is solidly established in the past, with roots that can be traced back to some of the earliest teachers of soul.
  • The majority of Tom’s work is based on spiritual traditions or the depth psychology of C.
  • Jung and James Hillman, respectively.
  • In his own life as an example, Tom explains that he did not “create” his life, but rather “found” it as he went along, believing and having confidence in life itself, even when he had no clue what was going to happen next.

While one’s unfolding may be referred to as “destiny” or “fate,” the terminology, metaphor, or poetic language we use to represent the Mysterious is mostly about our sense of its worth and our deep regard for it, which is what Thomas refers to as the “holy.” Moore’s personal feeling of awe for the Mysterious, which has molded his life, may be described in this way.

When the subject of formal religion came up, I inquired as to Thomas’ thoughts on the subject, which appeared to be diminishing in our modern environment at the time.

A religious experience is defined by him as a “creative and tangible reaction to the Mysteries.” He maintains that religion is more than just a concept or a belief, nor is it about improving oneself.

Moore cites the nineteenth-century authors, poets, and philosophers Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose grasp of religion was, in the words of Moore, a “personal experience of the holy.” Moore also cites the nineteenth-century poet, Henry David Thoreau, as examples of religious understanding.

  1. Thomas also believes that secular literature is sacred, indicating that it is where he receives religious and spiritual instruction.
  2. When I hear this, I am reminded of the alchemical saying that the “old king” must die in order for alchemical transmutation to occur and for something new to take its place in the world.
  3. Much of what we take for granted is in decline, including religion, the natural environment, and social structures around the world.
  4. We will be forced to evolve if we do not give up our resistance, I urge to Thomas, for it will happen whether we like it or not.
  5. He claims that in order to create a feeling of the holy, we must fight secular society as well as the science-based culture of today, because both cultures do not allow for the presence of the holy and the “other.” For us, the secular world is not sufficient in its own right.
  6. According to Thomas, the more we are able to connect with the transcendent and the inexplicable, the more human we become in a paradoxical sense.
  7. It was a powerful reminder.
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When I addressed this to him, he reminded me that James Hillman, with whom Moore had been friends for 38 years, had the belief that there is a soul in every object.

The choice, Thomas tells me, was to do both—to maintain his private practice in order to heal the individual, while also writing books in order to help bring a consciousness of soul to the world outside of ourselves.

As I read this, I’m reminded of how difficult it may be at times to really do the job, and how valuable and poignant it is when we are overwhelmed by the world and have dark nights of the soul.

For example, one useful technique is to express ourselves in poetic language, to find an artistic method to portray how we are feeling, even if it is aesthetically pleasing to do so.

Then I recall a lecture I attended not long ago, when Thomas discussed a Japanese art tradition called wabi-sabi, also known as the Japanese art of imperfection, in which fractures in ceramics are fixed with gold in order to accentuate and make them beautiful.

The author wonders aloud, “What if we had the sense of ourselves as basically and delightfully imperfect?” That would be really beneficial in getting us through those difficult times.

I’m curious in how we might bring the sacred more thoroughly into the common consciousness.

The church and the secular world are divided into diametrically opposed camps.

Something is not quite right.

Another step in the right direction is to seek out manifestations of the sacred in the natural world.

Nature is necessary for spiritual development.

Moore believes that bridging the gap between psychology and religion is extremely beneficial.

It is not possible to cultivate the depth of thinking, the “deep culture,” or a link with the wisdom of the past through secular psychology, all parts of the soul that are so vital to cultivating the soul of the world.

May everyone of us make that first step toward consciousness, in whatever modest and precious way we are able to do so.” You may listen to the whole conversation with Thomas Moore by clicking here (Approx.

Thomas Moore, Ph.D., obtained his bachelor’s degree in religion from the University of Syracuse.

He is the author of the book Care of the Soul, as well as nineteen other works, with four more publications scheduled to be released this year.

The two of them had been close friends for 38 years before he passed away.

For further information, please see the website.

Depth Psychology Alliance, a free online community for everyone interested in depth psychologies, as well as DepthList.com, a free-to-search directory of Jungian and depth psychology-oriented practitioners, were founded by her.

With the Assisi Institute, she received two-year diplomas in Archetypal Pattern Analysis.

She has also studied Technologies of the Sacred with West African elder Malidoma Somé, and she has been actively involved in Holotropic BreathworkTM and the Enneagram for over a decade now. Topics include: James Hillman, current affairs, Carl Gustav Jung, nature, and the soul.

Religious Interview: Examining the Religious Experience

Bonnie Bright, Ph.D., has written a guest blog article for us. The term “soul” is frequently used to refer to depth psychology techniques. Many prominent minds in the area have contributed some essential insights on the subject, and maybe none more so than psychologist and novelist, Thomas Moore, whose best-selling book, Care of the Soul, is one of the most recognized and regarded books on the subject in recent decades. In recognition of Pacifica’s 40th anniversary in April 2016, Thomas Moore will speak at the forthcoming Climates of Changeconference.

  1. Ms.
  2. While he went into great depth about his understanding of the distinction between spirit and soul, one thing that stood out to me was his assertion that the soul thrives on the “holy” and that it has a “non-human” quality to it that I found intriguing.
  3. G.
  4. Most professionals in both of these areas acknowledge the existence of something greater than what we can perceive, comprehend, or control inside ourselves and in the environment surrounding us.
  5. That is “not human,” in his opinion, because it is beyond the comprehension of any human person.
  6. Throughout his most recent book, A Religion of One’s Own, Thomas discusses many methods for reconnecting with one’s own spirituality.
  7. It is Tom’s opinion that current institutions — including religions — require reformation to better serve the needs of the modern day.
  8. Religious belief and practice, he maintains, are not just ideas or beliefs, nor is it about striving to be better than we are.

Moore highlights the nineteenth-century novelists, poets, and philosophers Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose grasp of religion was, in the words of Moore, a “personal experience of the divine.” Moore also cites the nineteenth-century poet, Henry David Thoreau, as examples of religious grasp.

Aside from this, Thomas believes that secular literature is sacred, affirming that it is where he finds religious and spiritual instruction.

When I hear this, I am reminded of the alchemical saying that the “old monarch” must die in order for alchemical transmutation to occur and for something new to take its place in the universe.

Much of what we take for granted is in decline, including religion, the natural environment, and social structures throughout the world.

We will be forced to evolve if we do not give up our resistance, since it will happen whether we like it or not, I advise to Thomas.

We must reject secular society and science-based culture, he argues, in order to create a feeling of the sacred, because these cultures do not allow for the presence of God and the “other.” For us, the secular world is insufficient.

According to Thomas, the more we are able to connect with the transcendent and the mystery, the more human we become, which is a paradox.

This was a timely reminder.

Upon learning of this, he reminded me that James Hillman, with whom Moore had had 38 years of friendship, held the belief that there is a soul in everything.

Hillman had decided to discontinue his private counseling practice in order to devote his therapeutic attention to the globe, Moore recollected.

In that moment, I am reminded of Jung’s statement that the work must begin with the individual, and that when we individually perform our own work, the ripple effect might spread throughout the globe.

As I speak with Tom, I inquire as to if he has any suggestions for dealing with the troughs that we are experiencing.

As Thomas points out, it is beauty that allows the soul to shine through.

Moore explains that while we are in the valleys or during the darkest hours of the night, we may all benefit from the concept of wabi-sabi because we are wabi-sabi at that time.

In answer, I consider how everyone of us has a unique manner of dealing with the obstacles that life throws at us, as well as a unique way of connecting with our inner selves, whether they are spiritual, mystical, or sacred in some other way.

Thomas believes that we are suffering as a result of our secularism.

Psychosis is indicated by the presence of this type of split in the brain.

The fact that we don’t separate what we do on one day of the week from what we do on the other days of the week would be beneficial to our productivity.

We will be able to make every attempt to stop the destruction of the natural environment that we are currently witnessing as a result of our actions.

Additionally, it takes time and effort—a lifetime process of passing through passes and initiations in order to evolve as a person—as well as a psychology that is more in-depth than what is now taught in most schools, according to Thomas.

Morality, values, and having a vision of the world are all taught in religious texts.

To be sure, engaging with depth psychology and seeking for the sacred in our own lives is only the beginning.

The entire conversation with Thomas Moore may be heard here (Approx.

At Syracuse University, Thomas Moore, Ph.D., earned his doctorate in religion.

Among his other works are Care of the Soul and nineteen additional novels, with four new titles scheduled to be released in 2016.

The two of them had been close friends for 38 years until he died.

Please see the website for further details.

Depth Psychology Alliance, a free online community for everyone interested in depth psychologies, as well as DepthList.com, a free-to-search directory of Jungian and depth psychology-oriented practitioners, are among her accomplishments.

With the Assisi Institute, she received two-year certifications in Archetypal Pattern Analysis.

She has also studied Technologies of the Sacred with West African elder Malidoma Somé, and she has been actively involved in Holotropic BreathworkTM and the Enneagram for over two decades. Current Affairs, C.G. Jung, nature and the soul are some of the topics covered by James Hillman.

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